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Today's News

  • Linking Kentucky to the World

    LEXINGTON — It’s hard to believe, but the guy heading up the 2010 World Equestrian Games is not really an expert in the saddle.

    “I have ridden a horse twice in my life,” laughs Jamie Link, the chief executive officer of the games, who calls Lawrenceburg his hometown. “I took a lesson at the Kentucky Horse Park and I took a 5-mile trail ride at Mt. Brilliant Farm. It was a blast.”

    Suffice it to say that Link is no Calvin Borel. And that’s just fine for the 1980 graduate of Anderson County High School.

  • Hoping to get better

    Even with the graduation of its most successful performer since Anderson County formed a girls' golf team in 2002, there is no fretting around the Lady Bearcat camp as they get ready to open the season.

    The team opens against Spencer County, next Wednesday, Aug. 11 at Wild Turkey Trace.

    Part of that calm is simply head coach Lynn Gritton's demeanor. He's laid back, does not put much emphasis on won-loss records, and preaches getting over a bad hole or bad day quickly.

  • McCormick enters race for sheriff

    An independent candidate for sheriff filed the required number of signatures Monday to be on the ballot for November’s general election, according to documents filed at the Anderson County clerk’s office.

    By doing so, Jeff McCormick, 48, of 568 South Main St., will challenge incumbent Sheriff Troy Young, a Democrat.

    Young defeated a challenger in May’s primary. No Republican filed to run for sheriff this fall.

  • Bearcat golfers looking to state

    If there were any bad side effects from an abrupt, somewhat unexpected coaching change, the Anderson County boys' golf team sure has not shown them.

    “We haven't talked about (team goals) but I hear them talking about going to the state (tournament),” says new Bearcat coach T.J. Spivey.

    Fresh out of Georgetown College and planning to teach fourth grade math at Emma B. Ward Elementary School, Spivey quickly accepted the position despite being contacted about the opening three days after the official start of fall practice.

  • Pornography, sex toy trial set for April

    The trial of a woman suing the Anderson County Fiscal Court on charges that she was sexually harassed, shown pornography and given a sex toy before being fired from the judge-executive’s office is scheduled to begin next April 11 in Anderson Circuit Court, according to Anderson Circuit Court documents.

    Lea Beasmore, who was fired last March, filed the lawsuit last May. In it she claims that county building inspector Dean Lickliter brought a sexual device commonly known as a vibrator into her office last Feb. 14 and gave it to her.

  • COLUMN: Ready as I can be

    Beginning about July 1, the question comes my way at least once a day.

    “Are you ready for football (or the fall sport of your choice) to get started?”

    Or sometimes, it comes in a more generic form: “Are you ready for school to start?”

    It means the same as the person that asks is usually just trying to make some friendly conversation that often evolves into our respective expectations for that sport in the upcoming season.

  • Cat killings up, dogs down

    Put mildly, 2009 was a bad year for cats in Anderson County.

    While overall euthanasia rates at the Anderson Humane Society were down nearly 14 percent, the number of cats euthanized jumped 24 percent from 2008, according to statistics from the organization.

  • Peavler's perfection punctuates August Blowout

    Mackenzie Peavler fired a perfect game as the Central Kentucky Batcats 14-and-under softball team routed the Gateway Heat, 9-0, in the championship game of the August Blowout, held over the weekend at Anderson County Community Park.

    The gem was a fitting end to a tournament in which Peavler went 3-0 and allowed one earned run.

    The Batcats are made up primarily of players from Anderson County and saw their record for the summer improve to 18-8 with the tournament title.

  • A voice for freedom

    BASRA, Iraq — Matt Hackathorn would love to be spending his time working on his Anderson City Road farm or hanging out with his buddies at Wash’s Cycles.

    But for now the lieutenant colonel has more pressing issues, including working to advance the voice of freed Iraqi soldiers, police officers and citizens.

    Hackathorn, a public affairs officer with the US Army, is stationed in Basra, Iraq’s southern most province that includes its only seaport, and an area key to making the war-torn fledgling democracy economically vibrant.

  • COLUMN: Bless our bourbon for helping fund schools

    Column as I see ’em ...

    Bet you didn’t know that money from the sale of bourbon will help buy your child or grandchild’s textbooks this coming school year.

    It will also help feed them, pay their teachers, put fuel in their buses and keep their classrooms warm on cold days.

    Yep, those awful, evil distilleries that pollute our souls with their wicked brew are without question our public school system’s greatest benefactors, and there’s not a thing you anti-alcohol types can do about it.