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Today's News

  • Police: Woman tried to torch house with grandmother still inside

    A Lawrenceburg woman who police say set her house on fire with her bedridden grandmother still inside Sunday night has been charged with first-degree arson.

    Investigators say they still don’t know why Cheryl Brogan, 41, of 309 Center St., started the fire, the first in a series of bizarre events that resulted in her arrest Monday near Little Rock, Ark.

  • Lady Bearcats leave nothing to chance

    CRESTWOOD – There was no way Anderson County was going to be an early March victim Monday night.

    Even though the Lady Bearcats were pitted against a nice little Carroll County team that some thought might be an Eighth Region tournament spoiler, there was no way that Anderson was going to be the victim of a shocking upset at South Oldham High School.

  • Student, 5, left sleeping on bus

    A preschooler was left sleeping on a school bus last Tuesday afternoon, and three Anderson County Schools’ employees were placed on administrative leave as a result, according to Assistant Superintendent Larry Basham.

    “We regret that it happened, but it did happen, so we have to deal with it,” Basham said.

    The child, a 5-year-old girl, boarded the preschool/kindergarten bus at the Early Childhood Center at the end of the day Tuesday, Feb. 24.

    The bus ran its route and went back to the garage, Basham said.

  • Fallen dancer, husband suing Alton Ruritan Club

    A woman who claims she was injured last March after falling on the dance floor at the Alton Ruritan Club is suing the club and two Lawrenceburg men who sponsored a dance at the club.

    Kathy and William Slaughter of Franklin County filed a civil suit late last month in Anderson County Circuit Court.

  • Letters to the Editor - 03.04

    Missed opportunity to teach a lesson

    To the editor,

  • Math is something to celebrate

    I’m a math nerd. I can’t help it — I absolutely love numbers.

    In fact, to this day, my high school calculus teacher has a hard time believing I ended up in a career working with words (of all things). I sometimes find it hard to believe myself.

  • District Sweep

    The mission is far from accomplished, but the first leg was mighty good for Anderson County.

    The Bearcats captured their second 30th District championship in three years Friday night, building a double-digit lead, then holding off Shelby County with clutch free throwing for a 55-49 victory.

    A standing room only crowd estimated at 2,300 people squeeze in to the Anderson County High School gym to watch a pair of battle-tested and fierce rivals go at it for the second time this year. Anderson won the first one, 46-42, on Jan. 3.

    Round two did not disappoint.

  • Determined Lady Cats take first title in 31 years

    Tony Kays leaned back in his office chair, then broke into a huge smile.

    “This feels as good as if we had beaten anyone else,” he said, reflecting on capturing his Anderson County’s first 30th District championship under his watch.

    Anderson had just thumped a good Spencer County team 66-51 for the Lady Bearcats’ first post-season crown of any kind since 1978. Kays was in college and many of the Lady Bearcats’ parents were still in high school, if that old.

  • Winners, however you look at it

    Lee Ruggles could not look.

    The fact that over 4,000 other eyeballs were affixed to her son standing 15 feet from the basket with Anderson County clinging to a 50-49 lead in the 30th District tournament championship game only made matters worse.

    Only 19.5 seconds were left on the clock.

    Lee Ruggles could not look, would not look. Turning her head left when Will Ruggles was off to her right, she closed her eyes. No chance on seeing a reflection on the opposite backboard.

  • Praying for a miracle - again

    By Shannon Mason Brock

    Staff Writer

    Eight years ago, Brianna Borwig experienced what her family calls a miracle — today, they’re praying for a second one.

    Brianna, now 12, was diagnosed in 2000 at the age of 4 with an inoperable brainstem tumor. She underwent radiation, but doctors said the tumor was still growing and that there was “no hope,” according to Brianna’s mother, Kim.

    Doctors recommended that Brianna go through chemotherapy to “buy time,” Kim said.