• Plucking treasure from the ashes

    Perhaps it’s because we both lost our fathers around the same time last year, but I took an instant liking to the fellow whose trailer burned Monday morning on Versailles Road.

    Perhaps it was something else.

    Whenever I cover a fire or similar tragedy that leaves a person or family homeless, I always make a point to ask if they’d like me to list items they need in the newspaper and give you, our readers, a chance to help if you’re so inclined — which you never fail to do.

  • Junk food is like water in your gas tank

    Can you believe October is already halfway over? Geez-o-Pete. That means we’re 36 days away from Thanksgiving and, yes, I’ll say it, 67 days away from Christmas. Better take advantage of all the warm weather this week. Winter will arrive in 63 days.

    Have you noticed your food cravings are changing with the season? We are creatures of both habit and our upbringing. My upbringing didn’t have much variety, for a Hoosier.

  • Hay’s for horses, so have plenty on hand this winter

    It’s hard to believe that winter is right around the corner. If you’re a horse owner, you should already be preparing your winter hay supplies.

    How do you estimate the amount of hay you will need? If you have mature horses at maintenance level, you want to feed a mainly forage diet.

    The estimate would be similar to a 1,100-pound horse eating 2 percent of its body weight. That equals 22 pounds of hay per day. Feeding for 120 days, December through March, would equal 1.3 tons of hay per horse.

  • Be a savvy shopper, no matter where you live

    You know that $25,000 car you’ve had your eye on? In just 10 years, it could cost almost $34,000, assuming prices rise by a mere 3 percent per year. That’s the reality of inflation, which is commonly understood as the increase in the price of any product or service.

  • BOZA vote could open Pandora’s box

    Column as I see ’em …

    I’m very much looking forward to Oct. 20, when the Board of Zoning Adjustments (BOZA) decides the fate of Francis Recycling, a mom-and-pop operation located on the Bypass that has run afoul of the conditions set forth when it was granted a conditional use permit in 2011. (See www.theandersonnews.com or last week’s paper for details.)

  • Now’s the time to go nuts for walnuts

    Fall brings a lot of color to our lives, between the winter squash and falling leaves. It can also bring a lot of calories. Some of which are healthy, some not so much. As we near November, I think it only fitting that we talk about nuts, from a tree.

    Here on the farm I have plenty of nuts, but my favorite is the black walnut! Yes, I know they are a pain in the yard. I’ve slung quite a few from the mower blades over the years. Thankfully, no one has ever been hit by one, though there are a few I’d like to strategically line up.

  • Kentucky Grazing Conference to focus on pasture health

    Participants attending the 2016 Kentucky Grazing Conference will learn new and innovative ways to think about their pastures and improve their operation.

    The conference is from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 19 at The Center for Rural Development in Somerset.

    It is sponsored by the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and the Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council.

    Among the presenters is Peter Byck, a journalism professor at Arizona State University. He will discuss how soil health can lead to increased farm income.

  • Know limits on nursing homes

    When there is a medical emergency, you most likely are not thinking about the bill. You need to get help right away.

    That’s why it’s emergency care, an unplanned medical need that requires immediate attention.  It’s not a planned medical event such as surgery.

    Don’t assume that the hospital billing procedures have your best interests in mind. They have to follow the rules for Medicare and Medicaid, which may have very different rules that your private insurance.

  • Nothing sad about going to Heaven

    The message was as simple as it was stark: “Cancel this subscription, please. I’m going to Heaven.”

    That message came to me last week on a subscription renewal form, one of thousands upon thousands we mail out each year, usually with nothing more in return than a check or credit card number.

  • Think about safety during fall harvest

    Fall harvest season is a busy time for Kentucky farmers and their families. It also is a peak season for agricultural injuries and an especially important time for farm families to pay attention to safety.

    Take time to talk to workers about safety. You need to be sure all workers are trained and physically capable of operating equipment and that they understand the safety procedures.