.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Want a cheerleader? Look somewhere else

    Column as I see ’em …

    As a customer of the city’s water and sewer department, I was happy report about the federal grant that will shave off nearly half of the debt the city was about to incur for the $2 million sewer project in Alton.

  • Even Putin can’t rig Anderson’s election

    Column as I see ’em …

    This fall’s presidential is rigged, depending on who you ask.

    Rigged is a slippery term. For those some consider pre-fitted for tinfoil hats, it can infer that the outcome is predetermined and we are all just pawns in some grand scheme — a Bush-Clinton cabal of New World Order types bent on global control, among others.

  • Clean the yard now for an easier spring

    Autumn has arrived in Kentucky and, as leaves change color and fall from trees, it is time to focus on landscape sanitation.

    Good sanitation practices can help reduce disease-causing pathogens. These organisms can survive for months or years on dead plant material or in soil, causing infections in subsequent years.

  • School district will recover from Goodlett’s arrest

    It’s been a difficult few weeks for LaRue County Public Schools, whether you work there, attend one of the schools, are a parent of a student or graduated from the district.

    For certain, the district has enjoyed brighter days.

    When those in leadership positions take missteps, it can shake a level of confidence. That’s what we see today at LaRue County, a district that is shaken, yet far, far from being crushed.

  • Same bands, different tastes leave Marching Bearcats hungry again

    It was somewhat fitting that the final performance of the 2016 season for the Anderson County High School Marching Band would come at a place named for a pizza empire.

    I’ll take the ham and pineapple. You can have pepperoni and mushrooms.

    We can both be happy.After having some pizza — Really, what else can you eat at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium? — the Marching Bearcats were just ready to finally claim that elusive big trophy they have been chasing the last five years.

    It was to be their year, you know.

  • Plucking treasure from the ashes

    Perhaps it’s because we both lost our fathers around the same time last year, but I took an instant liking to the fellow whose trailer burned Monday morning on Versailles Road.

    Perhaps it was something else.

    Whenever I cover a fire or similar tragedy that leaves a person or family homeless, I always make a point to ask if they’d like me to list items they need in the newspaper and give you, our readers, a chance to help if you’re so inclined — which you never fail to do.

  • Junk food is like water in your gas tank

    Can you believe October is already halfway over? Geez-o-Pete. That means we’re 36 days away from Thanksgiving and, yes, I’ll say it, 67 days away from Christmas. Better take advantage of all the warm weather this week. Winter will arrive in 63 days.

    Have you noticed your food cravings are changing with the season? We are creatures of both habit and our upbringing. My upbringing didn’t have much variety, for a Hoosier.

  • Hay’s for horses, so have plenty on hand this winter

    It’s hard to believe that winter is right around the corner. If you’re a horse owner, you should already be preparing your winter hay supplies.

    How do you estimate the amount of hay you will need? If you have mature horses at maintenance level, you want to feed a mainly forage diet.

    The estimate would be similar to a 1,100-pound horse eating 2 percent of its body weight. That equals 22 pounds of hay per day. Feeding for 120 days, December through March, would equal 1.3 tons of hay per horse.

  • Be a savvy shopper, no matter where you live

    You know that $25,000 car you’ve had your eye on? In just 10 years, it could cost almost $34,000, assuming prices rise by a mere 3 percent per year. That’s the reality of inflation, which is commonly understood as the increase in the price of any product or service.

  • Kentucky Grazing Conference to focus on pasture health

    Participants attending the 2016 Kentucky Grazing Conference will learn new and innovative ways to think about their pastures and improve their operation.

    The conference is from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Oct. 19 at The Center for Rural Development in Somerset.

    It is sponsored by the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and the Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council.

    Among the presenters is Peter Byck, a journalism professor at Arizona State University. He will discuss how soil health can lead to increased farm income.