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Columns

  • Check under your own hood first, governor

    Column as I see ’em …

    Like most of you who follow politics, I’ve taken notice during the past month or so of Gov. Bevin’s bare-knuckle brawl with a couple of TV stations and the daily papers in Lexington and Louisville, questioning their biases against him.

  • Keep your hay from going up in smoke

    You can prevent hay bale or barn fires if you bale hay at appropriate moistures and monitor the temperature of recently baled hay.

    Generally, hay will go through a heating phase within one to two weeks after baling. During this time, you should monitor the hay to make sure it doesn’t reach temperatures that can damage the hay or lead to spontaneous combustion.

  • Good wine, leftover BBQ chicken and a sweet treat

    I hope everyone had a safe and happy Fourth of July.

    I live out in the county, and although I love it, I wish the new firework ordinance applied out here.

    One of the things that make people move so far from town is peace and quiet. Not at this time of year. I must say it has been a little better this year. My dog would disagree.

    Not wanting to be a party pooper, I’ve got some great summer salad and drink ideas this week. Also, a great way to use leftover BBQ chicken.

  • Why you can’t cross the road for chicken

    Column as I see ’em …

    “Why in the heck can’t I cross over the median in front of Bojangle’s?” I asked myself soon after the chicken joint opened a few weeks ago.

    I would imagine you’ve asked yourself the same, so I snooped around for some answers this week, fully reminding myself that no matter what, I’d refrain making any idiotic chicken-crossing-the-road jokes in the meantime.

  • Striving to make Kentucky work ready
  • Don’t let spider mites ruin this summer’s vegetable garden
  • Enjoying summer flowers, starry nights

    It’s summer. I love our warmest season and we get three whole months of it. From todays Summer Solstice until the Autumnal Equinox in September, these are the longest and warmest days of the year. Surely we can find some time to just sit and enjoy Mother Nature each day or night.

    Admiring the beauty of flowers is pleasurable, but knowing a little something about them is even cooler. There are lots of books and online sources that will give you the history of specific flowers, as well as the facts and myths associated with them.

  • Grandmother reminds us to not forget the love

    Loyal readers of the food column:

    I apologize for not providing an article for close to a month. I have been saying goodbye to an amazing woman, 700 miles away.

    My grandmother Irene passed away last week at 96 years old. She was the matriarch of our family and will be missed terribly. In true Irish stubbornness, she fought hard for weeks to stay with those she loved. I spent a great deal of time with her growing up, so it was fitting to be there at the end. Surrounded by her eight children, we shared stories, memories and of course recipes.

  • Ordinance would bring sanity to fireworks use

    Column as I see ’em …

    First a little house cleaning. For those who care, I’m still in the Buffalo area, caring for my mom. Her will to live is incredible, and I’m a better man for witnessing that.

    Thanks to the tech wizards at our corporate headquarters in Shelbyville, I’m just about fully functional from here and able to access the computer on my desk as if it where in front of me, hence me filing some copy this week from afar.

  • Facts, management options for dogwood anthracnose

    Anthracnose of dogwood is a common problem in Kentucky.

    Symptoms on landscape and forest dogwoods often first appear during wet periods in late spring. If left unmanaged, the pathogen spreads, eventually resulting in plant death.

    Selection of resistant varieties and maintenance of tree health are critical for disease prevention.

    Dogwood anthracnose facts