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Columns

  • Prepare your trees for new breed of fruit-killing fly this spring

    I love the smell of fresh cut grass. To me, it carries the scent of watermelon, which always sends my brain to warm summer days and plenty of sunshine. Smell is the strongest memory trigger we have and that red fruit transforms me to childhood days of running through sprinklers and seed spitting contests. Summer isn’t here yet, but it is coming.
    Two of my most favorite holidays are coming, too. Earth Day will be here on the 22nd and Arbor Day is close behind on the 26th. This year, I’ve gotten a head start on my festivities.

  • Guarantee your child is prepared for school by starting at home

    Is your child ready for school?
    Child assessments are revealing that the majority of Kentucky children are not ready for success in school. Statewide only 28 percent of children are ready for kindergarten without additional support. Anderson County didn’t participate in the pilot screening so no local information is available for 2012.

  • Patience is a virtue, even for gardeners

    Patience. I’m pretty sure that’s what we all need right now.
    It is the middle of April and while a decade into our future we may be planting at this date, climate change has not taken us there yet.
    Our typical planting date here is right around Derby day. That does not mean that you can just sit around and wait.

  • Bibb lettuce has strong Kentucky roots

    Kentuckians may know that Bibb lettuce was developed by Major John Bibb in the backyard of his Frankfort home — Grey Gables (Bibb-Burnley House).
    He moved to Frankfort in 1856 and shared his seeds and plants with friends. Soon it became known as Bibb lettuce and became commercially produced in 1935.
    Soon you will be able to buy Bibb lettuce at the local farmer’s markets. The Anderson County Farmer’s Market opens Friday, April 26 at noon.

  • A band of cats invaded our garage, capturing my dogged devotion

    If you had asked just more than a year ago, I’d have sworn to you I was a dyed-in-the-fur dog person.
    I proclaimed my love for all animals — dolphins, dogs, elephants, frogs — but when it came to cats, I was uninterested. Never had a cat. Didn’t understand them — or their people, really. Required a preventative dose of Benadryl to stave off my sneezes when visiting their homes.
    But a funny thing happened when I got to know a few felines who were hanging around our neighborhood.

  • Manure tea and other tips to grow wonderful potatoes

    Cold weather wimp that I am, even I can work outside in this weather.
    Well, once the frost thaws.
    It was 26 degrees on the farm Good Friday morning  Great temps for the gravel truck to make it up my drive. I’ve been waiting since Christmas for the rain to stop and the clay like-mud to dry.

  • Planning is key to successful garden

    Gardening is not my area of expertise. However, I do have access to research-based information about gardening. Tommy Yankey, Anderson County Extension agent for agriculture and natural resources, will be conducting a home gardening class in conjunction with the food preservation workshop Saturday, April 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    You can register for the workshop by calling the Anderson County Extension Office at 839-7271.

  • No magic food to provide all you need

    A question was raised in the diabetes education class about which beans are healthier choices.
    Specifically the class member wanted to know if beans were all about the same in the total amount of carbohydrates.
    Several class members are starting to use carb counting as a method to improve their diet.

  • Take a class at Green Thumb University

    Spring snows are so funny. No one runs out for milk and bread. It just sort of appears in the air, always making us feel colder.
    I checked the Old Farmer’s Almanac and it was off by a week. Looking into April and beyond, I don’t see the word snow mentioned again, but “wet and cool” gets a lot of ink.

  • Send Easter egg hunt photos to the News

    I found the Easter egg nestled among clean clothes in my laundry basket.
    Not on Easter morning.
    Weeks later.
    An eight-hour drive later, after I was already back in my off-campus apartment in Seward, Neb.
    After I finally decided to put my clothes away because that’s what adults do after they’ve finished using their parents’ washer and dryer.
    Never fear; the egg contained individually wrapped candy, not a hardboiled center quick to stink and hasty to rot.