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Columns

  • Facts Christians want to ignore

    Editor’s note: The following is in response to faith columnist Jess Thompson’s column in last week’s paper titled ‘Facts non-believers don’t want to read.’ This work originally appeared on sharkysworld.com, and is reproduced with the author’s permission.

    I recently read an opinion piece in The Anderson News by Jess Thompson, and there seems to be some issues with his idea that non-believers don’t want to read his religion’s Bible.

  • Busy summer includes video message to troops

    Summer, 2012 has been hot, dry... and a lot of fun.  Thank you for the many invitations to join you as you celebrate, educate and recreate.  New Providence Presbyterian Church pastor, James Byrd, invited me to join the congregation and community in a time of prayer for our state and nation on Sunday, July 1.  It was an honor to pray for local, state and national leaders as we face many difficulties.  Thank you, New Providence, for including me in your inspiring service.

  • Enjoy canning, but make sure you follow directions

    I’ve had several questions about home food preservation. The most common question has been about loss of liquid in jars.
    A sudden decrease in pressure will cause loss of liquid. When canning, the pressure must drop of its own accord. Don’t put cold water on a canner or try to rush the process of cooling down. Lift the canner off the burner to cool on its own. Don’t force the lid open. It may take 20 to 30 minutes for the pressure to drop.

  • Tips help plants survive during dry weather

    Happy August. First, let me thank all those who danced, prayed and washed their cars because we did get a little rain to fall. Some got more than others.
    One night I watched the radar go from red/yellow to pale green as it got closer to the farm. It was like the trees were sucking all the moisture out of the clouds. There was nothing left by the time it got here.

  • Help and advice available for caregivers

    You probably know someone who is a caregiver to a parent, spouse or adult child. Some caregivers are retired and caring for a parent and a spouse.
    Many middle-aged adults are finding themselves caring and supporting two generations — their children and their aging parents.
    While caregiving can be very rewarding, it often can bring additional emotional, physical and financial stresses for caregivers as they try to balance a career, parenting and elder care.

  • Don’t let drought run food funds dry

    Thank the Lord, we received rain.
    Mother Nature sure can be fickle. I am always amazed a what a difference just a few miles makes when it come to rain. I may get a lot here on the farm and folks in town get barely a drop. It works the other way, too. It’s especially tough when I’m at work and watching the rain pour off the roof of the library in buckets, only to come home later and find not a drop of it fell on the farm.

  • Corn, tomatoes are nutritional summer treats

    I hope your garden is doing better than mine.
    I’m still waiting for the first tomatoes to ripen and gave up on the corn. My neighbor says that squirrels got the corn but I think it was raccoons.
    At any rate, every corn stalk was broken and some were strewn across the yard.
    Corn and tomatoes are plentiful in supply at the stores if not in your garden. Some people think that corn is not nutritious but they may need updated information.
    One-half cup of cooked corn contains only 90 calories, is low in fat and a good source of fiber and B vitamins.

  • Conservation tips for when rain is in short supply

    There is no typical summer here. Growing up in Indiana, I didn’t pay much attention to summer, except to have fun. I worked hard and played hard and enjoyed every day of it. It got hot and it rained, but I didn’t really pay attention to either. In Arizona, in was pretty much the same thing. Kentucky is a whole different ball of wax.
    Here, summer heat sneaks into spring and then leaves, only to come back again and again. It’s like a roller coaster of temperatures and precipitation. Over the past few years, summer just gets hot and dry.

  • Mission: Possible

    By Jess Thompson, faith columnist

  • Long drinks better than short for thirsty plants

    Caliente. Heiss. Chaud. Het.
    Those are just a few other words that mean hot in Spanish, German. French and Norwegian (I couldn’t resist).
    I just thought you’d like a few other terms to use while we’re sweating bullets in this heat. Even I think it’s hot, and that takes some doing.