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Columns

  • Two-spotted spider mites can be formidable pests

    The two-spotted spider mite (TSSM) is a common and destructive pest with an extremely wide host range that includes many trees, shrubs, flowers, weeds, fruits, and vegetable crops. Problems increase during hot, dry weather but early signs and symptoms are easy to overlook. Not only are these mites tiny but they live out of sight on the underside of leaves (Figure 1).

  • Berry growers: beware of Drosophila
  • Keeping plants watered, fertilized key in ‘dog days’ of summer

    I don’t scare easy. Sure, if somebody sneaks up behind me I’ll jump, but I’ll probably swing too. I’ve jumped out of airplanes, rappelled down mountains, even been surrounded by 300 Crips and Bloods that were more heavily armed than I, but I didn’t think a ride on the tractor would scare me.

  • The Bible trumps Darwinism: Why the Book of Genesis can’t be abandoned

    In a June 13 article for Associated Baptist Press, a Frankfort minister derided Bible-believing pastors and scholars for teaching that the Genesis account of creation is historic fact, as opposed to a metaphorical story.

    The article, entitled “It’s time for evangelicals to come out for evolution,” asserts that when it comes to the creation versus evolution debate “educated evangelicals know better.”

  • Kentucky’s stance on marriage has changed drastically, God’s hasn’t

    Last week, federal Judge John G. Heyburn II struck down as unconstitutional an amendment to our state constitution that made it illegal for Kentucky to recognize same-sex marriages or perform civil unions.

    The amendment, which was approved by 75 percent of Kentucky voters in 2006, reads, “Only a marriage between one man and one woman shall be valid or recognized as a marriage in Kentucky.

    A legal status identical or substantially similar to that of marriage for unmarried individuals shall not be valid or recognized.”

  • Reasons visitors want to come here…and just don’t know it yet

    Bravo to Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway for taking steps last week to revive the quiet local tourism commission.

    Conway appointed new members and re-appointed others in an effort to keep the county commission alive and, hopefully, renew its efforts to generate visitor traffic.

  • Managing the Asian tiger mosquito is important, particularly now

    The Asian tiger mosquito is a serious nuisance at best and a potential public health threat at worst.

    This aggressive day-biting mosquito prefers mammals, such as humans, cats, dogs, etc., but will occasionally feed on birds.

    It is capable of transmitting 30 viruses and the dog heartworm. This accidentally introduced species probably occurs throughout Kentucky.

    The ATM  (Figure 1) can carry the chikungunya virus, which has been in the news lately.

  • Prepare for fall garden planting... and try fried some pickles

    Here we are in our seventh month and if your green thumb has worked, as a gardener you should be in seventh heaven!

    The harvest season is on! Thankfully, we have more than 14 hours of daylight in which to do it.

    Those of us who plant for the pantry are beginning preparations for the fall garden now.

    Yes, I know you have planted your summer garden but it is time to plant another one if you like peas, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage.

  • Include ‘superfood’ blueberries in your diet with this recipe

    Blueberries are delicious and healthy. They are labeled a super food because of their high antioxidant content, fiber and vitamins.

    In the last 5 years, there have been reliable studies that support the health benefits of blueberries. Citations for these studies are available at the Anderson County Extension Office.

    One finding is that blueberries can improve memory.

    After 12 weeks of daily blueberry consumption, older adults showed improvement on two different tests of cognitive function, including memory.

  • My stay was brief but this community truly won me over

    I’ve become attached to Lawrenceburg and Anderson County.

    When I arrived 4 months ago, my familiarity was based on drives to Frankfort and stopping at the now defunct food court here on KY 127.

    My cousin was married in the Kavanaugh House and still lives in Lawrenceburg to this day.

    But next week will mark my final week at the helm of The Anderson News. While my stay was brief, my leaving is still bittersweet.

    Here is the view of an outsider who got to be an insider for a brief period.