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Columns

  • Better mousetrap? Try duct tape, steel wool

    I love the way Mother Nature adapts us to her weather with a cold one day and hot the next.

    We’ve entered the all-season month. October gives us time to adjust to the coming cold and get all those outside chores done, before we start to hibernate, and we’re not alone. Lots of four legged critters are looking for their warm winter home.

  • Using old wives’ tales to predict winter

    Welcome to October. Let the leaves come tumbling down. Our leaves have started to show their true colors and while they do look beautiful hanging from the trees, the sooner they make a carpet the happier I’ll be. Weather folklore says the longer they hang on the tree, the worse winter will be.

  • Might be a good year for creep feeding calves

    With record-high cattle prices, many Kentucky beef producers might look to creep feeding to put additional weight on calves before weaning.

    Beef specialist’s at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture usually are very cautious of the recommendation that we creep feed calves however, they believe creep feeding may provide an opportunity this year. If producers are careful, they could cash in.

  • Shorter days mean winter is on its way

    The slow roll into winter has begun. The sun is rising after 7 a.m. and dropping before 8 p.m., and we have already started to adapt our lives. How many times were you just coming inside to eat dinner at 9 p.m. this summer? Surely I’m not the only one.

    We adapt our lives to fit each season. Besides cleaning out our closets to make room for the bulky clothes of winter, we’re probably cleaning out our sheds to make room for tool storage and lawn chairs.

  • Time to ensure your vaccines are up to date

    Interesting health and illness statistics arrive weekly in my email. The Centers for Disease Control issues a weekly report on notifiable diseases and mortality tables. One of the reports is “provisional cases of infrequently reported notifiable diseases” (less than 1,000 cases reported during the preceding year.) A few of these are diseases that were once eliminated in the United States.

    Work is progressing worldwide to eliminate diseases such as polio and measles but total eradication hasn’t happened yet.

  • Biennial Beef Bash set for Sept. 25

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association will host the fourth biennial Beef Bash, a unique field day for Kentucky beef cattle producers, on Sept. 25 at the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton.

    “Research and outreach efforts such as Beef Bash are an important means of providing up-to-date information to cattle producers. “We also are keenly aware of the importance of the social and business aspects of cattle production.”

  • Women beaters waging the real war on women

    By Ben Carlson

    General Manager

    He held her down near the wood stove and put a gun in her mouth.

    That happened to someone I love very dearly a couple of decades ago, along with other instances of physical abuse that I didn’t know about at the time and only was made aware many years after the coward who committed those crimes wised up and moved away.

  • Easy tips to avoid excessive leftovers

    I don’t like leftovers, especially baked goods.

    There are easy ways to prepare food so there is less leftover. Packaged foods, including pasta salad mixes, macaroni and cheese, one dish meal boxes, cake mixes, and similar items can be prepared by making just a portion of the box.

    You can also make a smaller batch of cookies, cakes, casseroles, rolls, bread, etc.

  • Stink bugs on the rise in Kentucky fields

    Certainly this is the time to be checking your soybeans for the presence of stink bugs.

    I have not noticed economically important problems in the beans I have sampled, but stink bugs are certainly common and our light traps have been capturing very large numbers compared to previous years.

  • An open letter to those suffering from depression

    To Whom It May Concern:

    I could throw some statistic at you like “1-in-10 Americans reportedly suffer from depression,” but it wouldn’t matter. I could tell you “chin up, things will get better,” but right now you wouldn’t believe me anyway.

    I can tell you that I understand how you feel and that you are not alone. I suspect there are many others that are like you, but they’re too embarrassed to say so.