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Columns

  • Living wheat free poses dietary challenges

    Almost 40 years ago I became aware that some people who have to live wheat free.
    What’s good for most of us can be harmful for a few. Proper diagnosis should be done by a qualified medical provider as gluten intolerance or celiac disease is often confused with wheat allergy. This column isn’t about medical advice. My goal is to increase awareness of the challenges of living wheat free and offer some guidelines.

  • Good Friday is a great day to start potato plants

    I’ve discovered one down side to the mild winter. I didn’t get much of a workout and neither did the dogs.
    I got into “full garden mode” a couple of weeks ago and Spanky and Tiller joined in to help. Keep in mind that most everything is done by hand with a lot of swinging and digging and trips up the hill.
    The dogs follow my every step, with the exception of a rabbit run or two, and I take a lot of steps. Do you know that those fur balls had the nerve to sleep in the next day!

  • Be aware of warning signs of depression

    Depression affects older adults more than most people realize.
    Extension Homemakers in Anderson County and throughout the Fort Harrod area have been learning about depression.  
    The goal of the program is three fold:  
    Recognize signs of clinical depression and seek treatment.
    Reduce the stigma associated with having depression.
    Provide support for loved ones who experience depression.

  • Lose weight, lower your risk for type 2 diabetes

    You don’t have to knock yourself out to lower your risk – in fact, the findings of a major study show that modest weight loss can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than half.
    Here are some proven small steps developed by the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) to help you make gradual lifestyle changes to lose weight safely and keep it off.

    Small step No. 1

  • Early warmth sure to spawn plenty of pests

    As I write, Mother Nature is watering my garden. Listening to the patter of rain on the skylight is always peaceful. I think I can almost hear the couch and a book calling my name, but spring has sprung. There’s work to do, even in the rain.
    My peach and pear trees are enjoying their first blooming on the farm. The strawberries are starting to flower and so are my beautiful blue phlox.
    My asters are budding out, too.

  • Thoughts on preserving the fruits (and veggies) of your labor

    I’m thinking about canning, pickling and jams, and I haven’t even planted the first seed.
    I’m hoping for good production from my garden. I don’t want to put all the work into it and just get enough to eat fresh.  
    We have a wonderful publication on Home Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky ID-128. You can search it on-line or you can pick up a free copy at the Anderson County Extension Office.
    Limited supplies of the publication are available.

  • One word can help when stereotypes surface in conversation

    Biases and stereotypes are as common here as anywhere else.
    It’s challenging to know how to speak up without shaming the person who makes comments that are demeaning to groups of other people. After all, you don’t want to treat that person in an unfavorable way either.  
    I recently attended a seminar on effectively communicating respect and inclusion in today’s diverse business environment.

  • Listen to tree frogs for next storm forecast

    Those of us residing in the country have had the loudest of concerts, almost daily. It’s the peepers! Tree frogs have been making lots of noise, day and night, and it’s been wonderful! Did you know that peepers always get louder before a rain? True.
    There are more ways to predict rain. Spiders don’t weave their webs if it’s going to rain. Dewless mornings also predict rain.
    Dandelions and other flowers will close their blossoms before a rain.
    All are easy ways to lead you to the mower, instead of the lawn chair while the sun is out.

  • Now’s the time to get out and start getting your fingernails dirty

    As the sunshine-yellow blossoms of daffodils open, spring rolls in to warm our hearts and we get to roll up our sleeves.
    On March 20, the sun will officially shift into our vernal equinox, bringing the lively weather of spring with it. All I can say is expect everything, all four seasons, throughout the month.
    If nothing else, it will certainly keep us on our toes, as if the mud isn’t enough.

  • Corned beef always a hit on Saint Patrick’s Day

    I’m a member of the Anderson County Cattlemen’s Association.
    Every pound of beef I own is in the freezer, not on the hoof in the pasture. I produce good meals, not healthy calves and heifers. I’ll leave that end of the business to someone else.
    If you are interested in educational programs on beef production, please contact the Extension Office and consider joining the Anderson County Cattlemen’s Association.