.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • How to tell truth from fiction during election season

    The election campaigns are getting into high gear.  
    How do you know what’s true when one side says something about the other?  It’s hard to know the truth about all such claims. Some outrageous claims may actually be true and something that sounds true can be false.  I’m not taking sides on any issue.

  • Lessons learned from gardening mistakes

    I really love silver linings. Sometimes, however, it’s really tough to find them.
    Take this summer for example. We’ve had a high number of insect pests, unseasonably hot weather and record low rainfall. Needless to say, it has been a challenging summer for gardeners and farmers.

  • Lessons learned from gardening mistakes

    I really love silver linings. Sometimes, however, it’s really tough to find them.
    Take this summer for example. We’ve had a high number of insect pests, unseasonably hot weather and record low rainfall. Needless to say, it has been a challenging summer for gardeners and farmers.

  • Weeds, wildflowers thrive in dry conditions

    One thing I know for sure, the drought has toughened up the weeds.
    Since I mulch with newspapers and straw, I use my hands to pull up any weeds that appear in the garden. Some I leave, because the bugs like them better than anything I plant. Most others I pull and I’ve got the cuts on my hands to show for it.

  • Facts Christians want to ignore

    Editor’s note: The following is in response to faith columnist Jess Thompson’s column in last week’s paper titled ‘Facts non-believers don’t want to read.’ This work originally appeared on sharkysworld.com, and is reproduced with the author’s permission.

    I recently read an opinion piece in The Anderson News by Jess Thompson, and there seems to be some issues with his idea that non-believers don’t want to read his religion’s Bible.

  • Busy summer includes video message to troops

    Summer, 2012 has been hot, dry... and a lot of fun.  Thank you for the many invitations to join you as you celebrate, educate and recreate.  New Providence Presbyterian Church pastor, James Byrd, invited me to join the congregation and community in a time of prayer for our state and nation on Sunday, July 1.  It was an honor to pray for local, state and national leaders as we face many difficulties.  Thank you, New Providence, for including me in your inspiring service.

  • Enjoy canning, but make sure you follow directions

    I’ve had several questions about home food preservation. The most common question has been about loss of liquid in jars.
    A sudden decrease in pressure will cause loss of liquid. When canning, the pressure must drop of its own accord. Don’t put cold water on a canner or try to rush the process of cooling down. Lift the canner off the burner to cool on its own. Don’t force the lid open. It may take 20 to 30 minutes for the pressure to drop.

  • Tips help plants survive during dry weather

    Happy August. First, let me thank all those who danced, prayed and washed their cars because we did get a little rain to fall. Some got more than others.
    One night I watched the radar go from red/yellow to pale green as it got closer to the farm. It was like the trees were sucking all the moisture out of the clouds. There was nothing left by the time it got here.

  • Help and advice available for caregivers

    You probably know someone who is a caregiver to a parent, spouse or adult child. Some caregivers are retired and caring for a parent and a spouse.
    Many middle-aged adults are finding themselves caring and supporting two generations — their children and their aging parents.
    While caregiving can be very rewarding, it often can bring additional emotional, physical and financial stresses for caregivers as they try to balance a career, parenting and elder care.

  • Don’t let drought run food funds dry

    Thank the Lord, we received rain.
    Mother Nature sure can be fickle. I am always amazed a what a difference just a few miles makes when it come to rain. I may get a lot here on the farm and folks in town get barely a drop. It works the other way, too. It’s especially tough when I’m at work and watching the rain pour off the roof of the library in buckets, only to come home later and find not a drop of it fell on the farm.