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Columns

  • Turn children’s snow days into grow days

    I thought I was ready for winter. Sure, I had plenty of wood. Yes, I had my bag of Winter Melt and the shovel handy. I had the truck inspected and prepped for everything, almost.
    The one thing I forgot to do was lube the rubber seals in the car door. Whoops.
    Last Thursday night, when we got our first winter weather, I ended up banging on the door with my little lunch cooler to break the ice, and it worked. Needless to say, I sprayed the rubber the next day with olive oil.  Standing outside, in the wind and snow is not my idea of a good time.

  • Remembering 1994’s bitter winter blast

    We’ve complained in recent years about the single-digit temperatures we’ve seen from time to time during the winter months here in central Kentucky. So far this season, the 10-15 degree range is about as cold as we’ve gotten, but even at that you can hear grumblings from folks about how spring can’t show up fast enough.
    I thought I’d do a quick little write-up about the January we experienced here 18 years ago, just to jog our memories and remind us that it could be worse — a lot worse.

  • Summer’s warmth will be here before we know it

    Boy, have we been spoiled.
    This winter’s temperatures could have been a gardener’s dream, if we’d known. We could still have lettuce, spinach, turnips and kale growing, if we hadn’t put the gardens to bed. By this date last year, we had had 2.5 inches of snow.
    What makes it snow? Moisture and temperature are the two culprits. Moisture in the air gathers into droplets and when the temperature cools enough, ice crystals are formed. As more are formed they get heavier. When it gets heavy enough, it falls as snow. So, where’s our snow?

  • It’s never too early to start selecting seeds

    Happy New Year. I don’t know about you all, but I’m feeling all warm and fuzzy.
    It’s primarily because I got lots of warm stuff for Christmas, but other things, too. I received numerous pictures of family and friends along with letters and messages catching me up on their lives. What a great way to start 2012. Now, if only I can remember to write it.

  • Were gardening gadgets under your tree?

    Well, it’s here, the end of the year. There were moments when it seemed like it would never get here. Then time would speed up and we couldn’t believe it was December.
    Life is time. Some days it’s a slow stroll, others it’s a sprint. But it’s always a marathon filled with memories along the way.

  • Hoping almanac gets rest of winter wrong, too

    Well, this sure has been some weird weather.
    The library’s alliums are sprouting like it’s spring. I’m just thankful that all this precipitation has been in the form of rain and not snow.
    I guess that’s a good way to end the fall.
    Winter officially arrives tomorrow with the longest night. From then on, the sun will rise earlier each day and we’ll begin the slow roll back to spring.
    We’ll just get a little flakey between now and then.

  • Things to consider as year comes to close

    As we approach the end of the year, here are some topics that relate to that very subject.  
    Buying and selling a vehicle at the end of the year
    If you have sold or intend to sell a vehicle before the end of the year, be sure that the buyer transfers the vehicle at the county clerk’s office.  Just signing the title will not remove your tax obligation for the next year.

  • Cold aside, winter does have its upside

    We must be living right or we’re just plain lucky.
    That’s the only way to explain the recent warm temperatures and rain. Can you imagine what it would have been like if all that rain would have been snow? Makes me shiver just to think about it.
    Many of you came in to groan about my winter prediction last week, at the library. I’m right there with you, but my friend Ginny reminded me that we need the cold to kill off all these germs that are making people sick. I agree winter does have its upside, but that doesn’t mean I have to like it.

  • Obsession with consumption gives food for thought

    We were eating pizza — thin crust, perfectly crisp, topped with ooey gooey decadent cheesy goodness that was just the right degree of meltiness.
    As our eyes rolled back in our heads in pizza ecstasy, my friend Tara said she had recently read that the sign of a culture in decline is its glorification of its cuisine and deification of its chefs.

  • Can’t save them all, but walking dogs is a start

    If the idea of walking dogs appeals to you, but you are not interested in dealing with hassles such as obtaining licenses or procuring clients, volunteering to walk dogs for your local Humane Society can be a perfect opportunity to express your love and compassion for animals.
    Offering your services makes a positive impact on your community and a huge difference in the lives of many homeless dogs.