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Columns

  • Bee garden great way to give back to earth

    Sunrise to sunset, summer is awesome.
    Yes, I know it can get hot, but just watch everything grow.
    The warm evening temperatures have given tomatoes and peppers a big jump. Squash is appearing overnight.
    Blackberries are getting blacker by the day. Mother Nature is in full swing.

  • Break out the hose and watch your garden grow

    Summer is official here and that means the real fun is about to begin.
    Cabbage, potatoes, and squash should be gracing dinner tables everywhere, and beans, corn, cucumbers and tomatoes aren’t far behind.
    While I love my winter casseroles, summer food is my favorite.

  • Rebates are out there, you just have to try

    In April I mailed in a rebate request for a garden hose I had purchased locally.
    I received a postcard stating that I had forgotten to send in the receipt and had a couple of weeks to return it with the postcard attached. I was lucky to find the receipt quickly. It cost two stamps and less than 10 minutes altogether to get the $10 rebate.  
    Did you know that many rebates go unclaimed?  Consumers don’t complete the forms either on-line or through the mail. Others throw away the box with the bar code on it.

  • Pre-integration memories linger for black Anderson County student

    My story is about where I went to high school. To visit this, we have to go back to 1951, my first year in high school.
    It was September 1951 when the black high school students who lived in the city limits of Lawrenceburg were put on a school bus and transported to Lincoln Institute High School, located in Lincoln Ridge, about two miles from Simpsonville.
    Lincoln opened its doors in 1912; we have just finished 100 years. All black people who got out of high school before 1962 finished at Lincoln Institute, and the Lock Road kids went to Simmons in Versailles.

  • Military kids and pizza ingredients a good mix

    Last weekend I volunteered at the Operation Military Kids Family Camp.
    All of the families had the common bond of recent deployment.
    The families were able to relax and enjoy being a family. Lodging and meals were provided and fun activities were planned to help families celebrate togetherness.
    There were a lot of young children and about 10 teens along with the parents.
    The Department of Defense sponsors grants for these camps because evidence shows that strong families support service personnel.

  • Keep tomatoes off ground for bigger harvest

    I love this time of year. Though the mornings have been a little chilly, the days and nights have been super.
    At the end of the day, I love to watch the sun go down. It’s my “ah” moment of the day. The combination of the beautiful sky colors and the comfortable lawn chair just makes me sigh out loud, happy that the day has come to an end and sleep is not far behind.

  • Know signs of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Editor’s note: The following was provided by the Anderson County Health Department following the newspaper being told that two people in Anderson County have contracted Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever this spring. State officials said they have no reports of anyone contracting the disease so far this year.

    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) is a tickborne disease caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii.
    RMSF is a potentially fatal human illness that by the bite of infected tick species.

  • County changes require checking vehicle insurance

    For the past five years Anderson County has been a test county for a new insurance program for vehicles.
    This program was implemented statewide on June 5.
    What does this mean to you?
    By law, your insurance company is required to send a list of Vehicle Identification Numbers (VIN) that they have insured to the Department of Insurance each month.
    These VIN numbers are entered into the statewide computer database.

  • Rabbits and turtles are no match for determined farmers

    Ever have one of those days? I had one of those days, this past Sunday.
    It started out just great, with perfect weather for all my outdoor chores.
    I started at 7 a.m. and got all kinds of things done, projects completed and everything looked good. I even got to run a few errands off the farm and scored a great new indoor mini greenhouse, to boot.

  • Checklist to ensure child is kindergarten-ready

    Is your child ready for kindergarten?
    In Kentucky, children are admitted to kindergarten by age. If a child is age 5 by Oct. 1 of the school year, then the child is eligible for kindergarten.
    In Kentucky, school readiness means that each child enters school ready to benefit from early learning experiences that promote a child’s success. Beginning with the 2013-14 school year, all kindergarten students in Kentucky’s public schools will be screened with the BRIGANCE Kindergarten Screen.