.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • April’s longer daylight hours a boon for plants

    Wow! It’s the middle of April and we have light.
    We already have better than 12 hours and by the time May 1 rolls around, we’ll be pushing 14 hours of daylight.  I love it. It gives me more time to do stuff outside, and believe me, I always need more time.

  • Manage stress in the midst of busy parenthood

    Men and women feel stress in their role as parents. Part of the challenge is balancing family life and work life plus community service. Some parents also go to school and others work more than one job. So how do you have peace and harmony at home?
    There are some things only you can do. There are others that you think you are the only one who can do it. Some things can wait. A few tasks just can’t or won’t get done. I encourage you to have a serious discussion as parents about the responsibilities that drive your stress as a parent. How do they fit into the list above?

  • Spring brings tax deadline, absentee voting

    Spring is upon us. April is normally associated with rain, flowers or pollen, but at the county clerk’s office it is about boat license, delinquent taxes and absentee voting.
    Let’s begin with boats. All boat taxes and renewal decals are due in April.
    All delinquent taxes are transferred from the sheriff’s office to the county clerk’s office on April 16 at the close of business. If you haven’t paid your property taxes, do so before that date.

  • Early summer bonus for bugs and tissue makers

    Has anyone else’s nose been running like a faucet? There has to be plenty of something in the air that’s not normally this powerful.
    I don’t suffer from most allergies, but I have heard about the Ohio Valley crud. Maybe after 16 years here in Anderson County it finally caught me.
    Whatever it is, the makers of Kleenex must be very happy.

  • Living wheat free poses dietary challenges

    Almost 40 years ago I became aware that some people who have to live wheat free.
    What’s good for most of us can be harmful for a few. Proper diagnosis should be done by a qualified medical provider as gluten intolerance or celiac disease is often confused with wheat allergy. This column isn’t about medical advice. My goal is to increase awareness of the challenges of living wheat free and offer some guidelines.

  • Good Friday is a great day to start potato plants

    I’ve discovered one down side to the mild winter. I didn’t get much of a workout and neither did the dogs.
    I got into “full garden mode” a couple of weeks ago and Spanky and Tiller joined in to help. Keep in mind that most everything is done by hand with a lot of swinging and digging and trips up the hill.
    The dogs follow my every step, with the exception of a rabbit run or two, and I take a lot of steps. Do you know that those fur balls had the nerve to sleep in the next day!

  • Be aware of warning signs of depression

    Depression affects older adults more than most people realize.
    Extension Homemakers in Anderson County and throughout the Fort Harrod area have been learning about depression.  
    The goal of the program is three fold:  
    Recognize signs of clinical depression and seek treatment.
    Reduce the stigma associated with having depression.
    Provide support for loved ones who experience depression.

  • Lose weight, lower your risk for type 2 diabetes

    You don’t have to knock yourself out to lower your risk – in fact, the findings of a major study show that modest weight loss can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes by more than half.
    Here are some proven small steps developed by the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) to help you make gradual lifestyle changes to lose weight safely and keep it off.

    Small step No. 1

  • Early warmth sure to spawn plenty of pests

    As I write, Mother Nature is watering my garden. Listening to the patter of rain on the skylight is always peaceful. I think I can almost hear the couch and a book calling my name, but spring has sprung. There’s work to do, even in the rain.
    My peach and pear trees are enjoying their first blooming on the farm. The strawberries are starting to flower and so are my beautiful blue phlox.
    My asters are budding out, too.

  • Thoughts on preserving the fruits (and veggies) of your labor

    I’m thinking about canning, pickling and jams, and I haven’t even planted the first seed.
    I’m hoping for good production from my garden. I don’t want to put all the work into it and just get enough to eat fresh.  
    We have a wonderful publication on Home Vegetable Gardening in Kentucky ID-128. You can search it on-line or you can pick up a free copy at the Anderson County Extension Office.
    Limited supplies of the publication are available.