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Columns

  • Knowing teen relationships

    It’s graduation time. Most parents begin talking about success in school at an early age. How many parents actively talk about success in relationships?

    We hope our children are learning from us about how they can have healthy relationships. Maybe we need to share more about love, romance and relationship strengths.

  • Learn to manage vegetable soil insects

    There are several serious soil insect pests that we manage periodically in vegetable production, including wireworms, white grubs and seedcorn maggot.  Unfortunately, when symptoms of damage by these pests become apparent, there are no rescue treatments. Our management strategies are preventative, not reactionary. Two important factors that, in part, impact the risk of soil insect problems are rotation and field history.  The most challenging rotation for soil pests is one following established sod where wireworms and white grubs can be common.

  • Chill requires patience when planting

    Winter in spring? Well, we just had the Dogwood Winter and all I can say is don’t let the door hit you on your way out. As we usher in May, more blooms are on the way, and I for one sincerely hope we don’t get any more frosts.

    The old fashioned way of farming depended on a lot of observation before all the work began. Weathermen weren’t on the air telling people what to do to protect their crops. Keen observations of Mother Nature saved the day.

  • Take precautions to avoid tick bites

    Lone star tick nymphs and adults are active now. American dog tick adults will be looking for hosts soon, too.

    Personal protection, frequent self-inspection and prompt tick removal are keys to reducing tick bites and potential health consequences.

    Ticks can be encountered throughout the Kentucky outdoors. They are most common in overgrown vegetation along forest edges and trails commonly transited by deer and other wildlife.

  • Select local foods for healthy eating

    Using local foods is a way you can support local growers and perhaps eat healthier. I say perhaps because freshness depends on how much time lapses between harvesting and eating and how the food was stored.

    Consumers want to know that the foods they choose to eat and drink are safe and healthy. At the same time, today’s food consumer expects great taste, convenience and good economic value. Sometimes it’s difficult to get all that in one package.

  • Celebrate Earth Day the right way

    Happy Earth Day. This flower power holiday got its start from a bunch of 1970s hippies and boy, am I glad. One of my most memorable ones was in the 80s, rolling a Volkswagen size earth ball down Oak Creek Canyon in Sedona, Arizona. Today, I’m just planting things to make Mother Earth more beautiful.

  • Gas tax, heroin bill major factors in session

    By James Tipton, State representative

    The state legislature closed out the 2015 edition of the General Assembly in the early morning hours of March 24. As the clock approached midnight there was important legislation that still needed to be addressed so leadership decided to recommend that the General Assembly extend into our 29th legislative day which ended around 4 a.m.

  • Enjoy nutritious asparagus while it’s still in season

    Asparagus is in season now through May.

    While it’s frequently overcooked, it can be eaten raw, lightly boiled, steamed, grilled, stir-fried or baked. The secret in cooking is not to cook too long and not to let it get too mature before harvesting. The more mature the asparagus is, the tougher the stems.

  • Alfalfa weevil is key pest of the first alfalfa cutting

    Alfalfa weevil is a key insect pest on the first alfalfa cutting. Tip feeding should show up soon in established fields.

    This insect occurs throughout the state, but sound management practices, weather patterns, and natural enemies often keep numbers below damaging levels in many fields.

    Great natural mortality of alfalfa weevil can occur early in the weevil season. Strong winds and driving rain can knock small larvae to the ground where they perish. In addition, alfalfa can tolerate light feeding by the insect with no appreciable loss of yield or quality.

  • Addressing misunderstandings, concerns from 2015 session

    By Julian Carroll, State senator

    Since concluding the 2015 legislative session, I have had the opportunity to finish reading e-mails and phone messages from many of your readers. I appreciate everyone who shared his or her concerns with me. Below I have attempted to address some of the concerns and questions as well as respond to possible misunderstandings.

    State employee compensation