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Columns

  • Get a jump by starting melon seeds indoors

    It will get warmer, we just have to wait for it.
    That’s the tough part, waiting. I am such a wimp when it comes to cold. It’s hard to motivate myself to get outside, when I have to dress in layers. At this rate, I’ll be wearing my long underwear into May.
    We can get a head start outside by starting inside. Now is the time to start melon seeds inside. Watermelon and cantaloupe are warm weather crops that can be a lot of fun. There are so many different varieties to choose from that it’s almost hard to pick.

  • Broadband access proves burying agendas moves county forward, not back

    Congratulations, rural Anderson County. You will soon have high-speed internet accessibility.
    That’s a big deal to some. As my good friend Monty Collingsworth of Collingsworth Consulting once said, “High speed internet may not bring new jobs, but it will sure stop them if they decide to locate to one of our rural areas and we don’t have it.”
    I would personally like to thank Collingsworth the most because he did much of the groundwork for this breakthrough.

  • Spring’s here so get going in the garden

    What a wild weather ride.
    It sometimes seems like we have all four seasons in one day.
    One thought keeps me moving, though, summer is coming. Despite the wild fluctuation of temperatures, we really have to get busy.
    If you haven’t sprayed your fruit trees with dormant oil to protect them against disease and bugs this summer, you better get cracking. You should fertilize them now, as well. Nitrogen in the form of ammonium nitrate or manure will work. Grass clippings add nitrogen as well.

  • Kentucky will finally put an end to the jinx

    Column as I see ’em …
    Several years ago I wrote a fairly unpopular column about my life as a jinx.
    Although somewhat tongue in cheek, it nevertheless has a foundation in reality because, frankly, no matter where I’ve lived nearby college and pro teams just can’t win a championship.
    As a kid, I suffered through my beloved Buffalo Sabres losing to Philly’s Broad Street Bullies for the Stanley Cup. They came close again years later, only to lose on an absolutely terrible call to the Dallas Stars.

  • Since we eat them, we might as well grow them

    Spring has sprung and all I can think is “Ah, warmth.”
    It’s a psychological high unmatched by anything after the winter we had this year. I say psychological because 60 degrees outside is different than 60 degrees inside. One calls for shorts and flip-flops, the other a sweater and slippers.
    Go figure.

  • Still hopeful that Medicaid shortfall will be solved

    Less than a week after the 2011 Regular Session concluded, my colleagues and I once again found ourselves at the state capitol to address the inevitable—a compounded Medicaid budgetary shortfall.
    With the projected shortfall for the upcoming fiscal year at an estimated $166.6 million, the governor exercised his ability to call the legislature back to Frankfort for an extraordinary session.
    The authority to call and to set the agenda for an extraordinary session lies solely with the governor, and he placed only two topics on the session call.

  • The end to three very interesting journeys

    There are certain people that you just remember.
    Some you remember because they are characters.
    But then you have some people you remember just because you do.
    There are three women that have recently come to the end of their journey and left a void in a lot of lives for that very reason, at least to me.
    First is Mary Elizabeth Cammack Perry. I never knew her real name until I read her obituary. Everybody called her Lizzie. She was 100 years old.

  • One detests bullies, the other yellow signs

    We all knew them in school, the children who for whatever reason were constantly the butt-end of jokes, taunts and in some cases physical abuse.
    They were either too heavy or thin or had too many pimples.
    They wore entirely the wrong clothes, had entirely the wrong kind of footwear and hung out with entirely the wrong crowd — if they hung out with anyone at all.
    Their grades were either too high or low, making them book nerds or “retards.” They were too short or tall, and if the latter, chastised for being too clumsy to play sports.

  • Kentucky phrases are like music for those listenin’

    “Lord have mercy, children,” my mother would say, when something really bad was going on.
    She used another colloquialism; it was “Law-zee-day.” I spelled it phonetically because I don’t really know what she was saying. But when she said it, I knew something wasn’t right, for sure.
    I grew up in Harlan, so of course I heard plenty of colorful phrases.   

  • Beshear’s failure to reduce costs leads to ‘no’ vote 

    The gavel has fallen on another session of the General Assembly as we adjourned last week.  Although the issue of a shortfall in Kentucky’s Medicaid budget remains, we still passed nearly 100 pieces of legislation during the 2011 session.
     The two biggest bills we considered during the 2011 session were House Bill 305, dealing with a shortfall in Kentucky’s Medicaid budget, and House Bill 225, which sought to increase the dropout age from 16 to 18.