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Columns

  • Sign up now for your county business license

    As we approach July, I thought it was appropriate to the county business license.
    In 1987 the fiscal court adopted an ordinance that imposed business license fees for the privilege of engaging in a business or profession in Anderson County. The ordinance was last revised in February.

  • Veggies in growth mode, so add fertilizer

    It’s official; summer is here. I’d like to repeat my request that we all ask for an inch of water a week.
    Gardens put a lot of food on the table and blessed rain makes it possible. Weather geek that I am, I just looked up the statistics for last summer in hopes of seeing a pattern to predict July’s weather.
    In May 2010, we had 9.22 inches (8.98 this year) and an average high temperature of 77 degrees (73 this year). By this time in June of last year we had 2.25 inches and ended up at month’s end with 5.29 inches.

  • When the heat’s on, look for water

    Living in Arizona for 23 years gave me a lot of insight into heat. As a park ranger I saw a lot of its effects. Visitors would always, always say, “but it’s a dry heat.” My reply, “so is an oven.”
    High heat takes a toll on all living things.
    If you work outside in this heat, my advice is to drink lots of water and eat ketchup and/or bananas. The potassium helps. If you have plants in the ground, then mulch and water is the best reviver.

  • Capitalize on tourism to invest in future

    We need to capitalize on tourism
    “The tourists are coming, the tourists are coming!”
    With all due apologies to Paul Revere, William Dawes and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, let the rallying cry ring out; for indeed the tourist are coming.

  • Absorbing accents

    Accents cling to me.
    I don’t invite them in. It just happens, every time I move and anytime I constantly hear a specific regional dialect.
    Chameleons change color. Tigers stalk prey in striped fur to match their dark jungle habitat.
    Speech becomes my camouflage.
    As I adjust to living here, I’ve caught myself falling into a Southern dialect when I’m talking. Don’t get me wrong; I wouldn’t mind having a Kentucky accent.
    I’m just never consistent.

  • Know how and when to water your plants

    Since I am in full mowing mode and have finally begun to work in the garden, I get to appreciate all the sites, sounds and smells of the farm.
    Everything is green, wildflowers dot the landscape and it’s all totally beautiful.

  • Muddy first impressions of Lawrenceburg

    I knew Kentucky was famous for its horses.
    I didn’t expect to see a Swamp Donkey.
    Last Saturday’s mud bog involved horsepower of a different kind, something unusual to the eyes of this reporter.
    After living in central South Dakota for a couple of years, I’ve seen my share of bucking bulls, rodeo cowboys and mutton bustin’.
    I didn’t possess the bravery of my preacher father, however, who once bonded with a parishioner while castrating bulls.
    I think I chose to take in the sights of a cow pie bingo instead.

  • Help Anderson Humane Society get a new vehicle

    Anderson Humane Society is proud to announce we’ve been selected as a finalist in Toyota’s 100 Cars for Good program. Now we need your support.
    Vote for Anderson Humane Society at www.facebook.com/toyota on June 4.

  • Manure tea just the thing for soggy soil

    May is over and June has arrived. Let’s just be thankful for every sunrise we see.
    Tornado season is upon us. One of them hit the family farm in Huntingburg, Ind., last week. Though no one was injured, there is not a building that didn’t get damaged. Insurance will cover the costs but what a rough road ahead. We’ve been lucky here, so far.

  • Kentucky’s history wrapped in West Virginia lore

    The late Tom Clark, historian at the University of Kentucky, said something once that has always stuck with me: “Virginia is the mother of Kentucky and Kentucky is the mother of the West.”
    So true, we are the sum of all the history of Virginia, and to ignore it is to ignore the history of Kentucky.
    As I completed the article on long hunters, I remembered one of the probably most entertaining stories of Virginia, as not all explorers wore buckskin and linsey-woolsey, some wore satin and velvet.