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Columns

  • Focus on spreading the gospel, not building mega churches

    Here is an interesting thought: Why is it that around every corner from Ninevah to Stringtown from North Anderson to South Anderson there are church buildings?
     When I say buildings, I mean mega, multimillion dollar church buildings.  Some right on top of one another.  Best selling author David Platt in his book, Radical Together, says, “Why would we spend an inordinate amount of our resources on something that is never prescribed or even encouraged in the New Testament?

  • Now it’s time to harvest the fruits of labor

    I can’t believe it’s the end of July.
    I have noticed that it’s getting light later in the mornings and that’s my reminder that the season is passing, however slowly. I took the time one morning last week to spend a few glorious minutes just sitting on the porch, listening to Mother Nature. It was incredible.

  • Debunking climate change and Obama’s debt ceiling scare tactics

    It’s hard to believe we’re halfway through summer.
    I’ve enjoyed the opportunity to visit with many of you at school sporting events, graduation ceremonies, county fairs, local festivals and Chamber of Commerce events.
    I appreciate this opportunity to share my thoughts on issues so many have recently mentioned by e-mail, phone and/or in person. Please don’t hesitate to contact me with questions, concerns and speaking requests. I’ll make every effort to accommodate your groups’ wishes.

  • Worshipping the tomato

    I joined a church.
    The holy order of the worship of the summertime tomato.
    I’m the official acolyte, but I suspect I’m not the only devotee.
    To think, just last summer, I was an unbeliever.
    I hated tomatoes.
    No matter what state I lived in or what chaos invaded my life, my dislike would remain constant. Nothing could change my hatred for the watery, weakly acidic flesh that was the tomato.
    Until I discovered the Farmer’s Market.

  • Snip, can way to year-round veggies

    Well, the mercury is rising again and with the exception of the high electric bill, I’m enjoying it.
    Remember a deep red sunset usually indicates prolonged good weather. A deep red sky in the morning usually means rain is on the way.
    The garden is simply loving this weather.  High temperatures and an inch (or more) of rain a week is perfect. The canning and preserving books are flying out the door at the library. Those of you new to bumper harvests may need a little help.

  • Fasting from nostalgia

    Going back is my specialty.
    Recently, I journeyed to my birthplace and personal Mecca all of things food, sand and sea—Long Island, NY.
    My childhood is wrapped up in hazy memories of trips on the ferry, my face smacked with the smell of salt in the air. Melted coconut Popsicle on sandy toes. Biting my lip right before diving before the white crest of a wave.

  • Anderson’s new $2 million eyesore

    If the average picture is indeed worth a thousand words, this group of photos of the weeds growing unabated around the new health department building are worth millions.
    That’s good news, because instead of my usual 700-word column, I’ll instead let the photos do most my talking for me this week.

  • America’s Civil War brought about civil rights

    April 12 of this year marked the 150th anniversary of America’s Civil War.
    Outside the American Revolution and the creation of the United State Constitution, the Civil War is arguably the most seminal event in American history.
    For the next four years, Kentucky and the rest of the United States will remember this event and its lasting effects on American society.

  • C’mon, folks, let’s dish a little dirt

    I love science and all its “ologies,” especially meteorology, archaeology, entomology, geology and pedology, the study of dirt.
    So, I thought I’d combine all of the above this week, because we make an impact on all of them, right here in our own back yards.
    So let’s dish a little dirt.

  • Anderson County’s bourbon a hit with soldiers following Civil War

    Early Anderson County was rich in farmland with tobacco, hay, corn, wheat, hogs, cattle, sheep and hemp raised.
    Another pride of Anderson farmers was the horses and mules it raised. However, stills were abundant all over the county before the Civil War; through oral history interviews I counted at least 50, but these were all small operations. However, two legends of note were created by the quality of the booze.