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Columns

  • Worshipping the tomato

    I joined a church.
    The holy order of the worship of the summertime tomato.
    I’m the official acolyte, but I suspect I’m not the only devotee.
    To think, just last summer, I was an unbeliever.
    I hated tomatoes.
    No matter what state I lived in or what chaos invaded my life, my dislike would remain constant. Nothing could change my hatred for the watery, weakly acidic flesh that was the tomato.
    Until I discovered the Farmer’s Market.

  • Snip, can way to year-round veggies

    Well, the mercury is rising again and with the exception of the high electric bill, I’m enjoying it.
    Remember a deep red sunset usually indicates prolonged good weather. A deep red sky in the morning usually means rain is on the way.
    The garden is simply loving this weather.  High temperatures and an inch (or more) of rain a week is perfect. The canning and preserving books are flying out the door at the library. Those of you new to bumper harvests may need a little help.

  • Fasting from nostalgia

    Going back is my specialty.
    Recently, I journeyed to my birthplace and personal Mecca all of things food, sand and sea—Long Island, NY.
    My childhood is wrapped up in hazy memories of trips on the ferry, my face smacked with the smell of salt in the air. Melted coconut Popsicle on sandy toes. Biting my lip right before diving before the white crest of a wave.

  • Anderson’s new $2 million eyesore

    If the average picture is indeed worth a thousand words, this group of photos of the weeds growing unabated around the new health department building are worth millions.
    That’s good news, because instead of my usual 700-word column, I’ll instead let the photos do most my talking for me this week.

  • America’s Civil War brought about civil rights

    April 12 of this year marked the 150th anniversary of America’s Civil War.
    Outside the American Revolution and the creation of the United State Constitution, the Civil War is arguably the most seminal event in American history.
    For the next four years, Kentucky and the rest of the United States will remember this event and its lasting effects on American society.

  • C’mon, folks, let’s dish a little dirt

    I love science and all its “ologies,” especially meteorology, archaeology, entomology, geology and pedology, the study of dirt.
    So, I thought I’d combine all of the above this week, because we make an impact on all of them, right here in our own back yards.
    So let’s dish a little dirt.

  • Anderson County’s bourbon a hit with soldiers following Civil War

    Early Anderson County was rich in farmland with tobacco, hay, corn, wheat, hogs, cattle, sheep and hemp raised.
    Another pride of Anderson farmers was the horses and mules it raised. However, stills were abundant all over the county before the Civil War; through oral history interviews I counted at least 50, but these were all small operations. However, two legends of note were created by the quality of the booze.

  • Summer includes plenty of pickin’, fishin’ and swimmin’

    Whenzitready? A one-word question I hear a lot these days. I love it. It means people are growing things.
    The best part of growing your own vegetables is you get to pick them when their flavor is peaking. My grandfather always carried a knife and a salt shaker in his pocket in the summer. He liked to test things right in the garden.

  • The great American Dream

    I interviewed Annie one summer ago.
    She was getting her hair and make-up done, along with her grandma Fran, in preparation for a long-awaited trip to New York City.
    Annie had been cancer-free for several years. The Make-a-Wish foundation was finally making good on its promise of a trip and makeover for the 17-year-old.
    She was a quiet girl.Wouldn’t talk about her mom much; her grandma was her legal guardian now.
    Annie told me she wanted to be an advocate someday and help other children who had cancer, children who came from broken homes.

  • Independence Day celebrates struggle for ‘perfect union’

    This 4th of July marks the 235 anniversary of America’s independence from British colonial rule.
    The Continental Congress declared the 13 colonies free and independent states and absolved any allegiance from Great Britain.
    However, just six months prior, this thought was inconceivable. Congress had previously met only to regress their grievances with the British government. What changed this and what did the Declaration bring forth?