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Columns

  • Grow ginger to ease colds, soothe muscles

    Let’s all toast the sun. Life is bursting out all over. The trees are either budding or blooming, and the lawns are verdant green. It’s those over achievers in the yard that are driving me crazy. Those military tough broadleaf weeds and wild garlic just want to be outstanding. Before you break out the mowers, let’s hit them with a little killer.

  • Learn how to manage diabetes

    There are about 370,000 people diagnosed with diabetes in Kentucky. This number may be larger if we consider that an additional 137,000 individuals are undiagnosed, making a total of 507,000 living with diabetes. Kentucky has the sixth highest rate of diabetes in the nation, making it important for us to take action.

  • Spring a good time to be weather aware

    This is a good time of year to see how weather aware you are in your household.

    You don’t have to be a weather nut like me to take common sense precautions. Check your batteries in your flashlights. Bring pets inside. Check on a neighbor. Make sure the sump pump is working, if you have one.

    Last, but not least, make sure you have discussed hazardous spring weather with your family and make a plan on what to do and where to go.

  • Understand, be wary of grass tetany

    Spring in the Bluegrass is a great time of greening and warming, but it’s also a time when livestock producers need to watch out for grass tetany, also called spring tetany or grass staggers.

    Some people also refer to it as wheat pasture poisoning, winter tetany or lactation tetany. Regardless, it’s a condition caused by an abnormally low level of magnesium in the blood of livestock.

  • April brings warmth, chores and flowers

    Well, I might as well tell you, I’m selling the farm and moving in town. I’m just getting too old to do this stuff. My get up and go has got up and went.

    The only gas I have left escapes when I cough or sneeze. I blame my father for always calling me a little fart. Oh come on folks, don’t be sad. Look at the calendar.

  • Time to think about spring weather safety

    After record snowfall and bitterly cold temperatures, most Kentuckians welcome the transition into spring. Still, changeable weather is one of the harbingers of the season, and often it comes in the form of high winds and blustery conditions. Even though tornadoes can occur in any season, they are most common in spring, along with downbursts and windstorms.

  • Talking boats, property taxes and new registrations

    An open house and ribbon cutting ceremony is scheduled for the new county clerk’s office on Thursday, April 23 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. The new office is located at 100 South Main St., Lawrenceburg.

    Spring is upon us. April is normally associated with rain, flowers or pollen, but at the county clerk’s office it is about boat license, delinquent taxes, a new drive-thru and a new registration process.

  • How’s your relationship with money?

    At the end of the month, do you wonder what happened to your money? Are you regularly tempted to spend when you have a few extra dollars in your pocket?

    Spending and savings habits are directly linked to financial stability. Understanding how and where you spend money is important for financial success, especially in tough economic times.

    One important step for managing your household budget is to develop a spending plan for your money. Doesn’t that sound better than “budget?” Use the following steps to develop your family’s plan.

  • Think about it before adopting just one more

    By Jane Sinnett, Guest columnist

    I looked into those amazing eyes, one blue, one white, and was ready to go to the front desk and tell them I wanted that one.

    My heart said yes but my mind said, let’s wait a minute. My mind and heart do battle with each other when it comes to just one more animal.

  • Skunks, potting soil right on time

    I sure have been enjoying these later nights. I kind of like driving home from work when the sun is still up. Driving at dusk is what I call “deer-thirty,” and I have 16 miles of it. Of course, there are other wildlife showing themselves in droves this time of year, but one is especially distinctive.