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Columns

  • Are local monument’s days numbered?

    Like it or not, the Confederate soldier statue in front of our glorious old county courthouse is an endangered species.

    Like nearly every social construct or traditional value, monuments to those who fought on the losing end of the Civil War are and will continue to be under withering assault from those who loathe our nation’s founding, and in particular, its founders.

    No pun intended, but those radicals are like patience on a statue, and are relentless in their incremental approach to force the changes they want.

  • Gearing up for dog days of summer

    Last week was a scorcher. I’m hoping this week will be a little cooler with the rain. I’m trying to gear myself up for the dog days of summer. The kids go back to school, traffic picks up, and I feel less and less like cooking. It’s time for big dinner salads, cold soups, lighter fare, and as much as possible on the grill. (no cleanup) .

    I like to use leftover corn that I’ve grilled previously. If using fresh, uncooked corn, you can char the outside in about 5 minutes over a gas flame.

    Roasted corn soup with avocado

  • sanity to fireworks use

    Column as I see ’em …

    First a little house cleaning. For those who care, I’m still in the Buffalo area, caring for my mom. Her will to live is incredible, and I’m a better man for witnessing that.

    Thanks to the tech wizards at our corporate headquarters in Shelbyville, I’m just about fully functional from here and able to access the computer on my desk as if it where in front of me, hence me filing some copy this week from afar.

  • Are you remaining silent as evil and sin run rampant?

    I saw an interview this week with a man who owns an orchard and family farm near Lansing, Michigan.

  • Keep trees free of cedar-apple rust

    Cedar-apple rust is the most common and economically important rust disease of apple in Kentucky. Symptoms of this disease are beginning to appear across the state. The pathogen overwinters as galls on cedar and juniper. Removal of these pathogen sources on cedar can later reduce disease incidence on apple. Once apple trees become infected limited management options are available.

    Cedar-apple rust facts

  • Celebrate Memorial Day with these recipe ideas

    Make your Memorial Day memorable. This is always such a busy time of year with graduations, weddings and getting ready for summer vacations.

    Whether your hosting a party this weekend or going to one, these recipes are easy and fast to prepare and you’ll look like a star.

    Red, White and Blue Salad

    5 ounces package of baby kale

    1 pint strawberries, quartered

    1 6 ounce container blueberries

    1 5 ounce container crumbled feta

    1/4 cup salted roasted sunflower seeds

    1/4 cup buttermilk

  • Losing my mother, gaining a brother

    My mom’s dying, and I’ve been gone for a few weeks spending time with her before it happens.

    When that will be God knows; the rest of us are left to sit, wait and be thankful for the short time we have to be with her.

  • Fire blight symptoms visible

    Fire blight is the most important disease of apple and pear in Kentucky.

    Symptoms have begun to appear throughout the Commonwealth; however, initial infections occurred at bloom. The pathogen survives winter in dead, dying, and diseased wood and in cankers. Removal of these pathogen sources can reduce spread of fire blight and should be completed in late winter while the pathogen is dormant.

    Fire blight facts:

  • The lowdown on Bill Best’s beans

    Well, Mother Nature seems to have entered her schizophrenic stage. We’ve had sweltering heat and cold rains, dry nights with high temps and wet nights with cool temps. For our summer vegetables, it’s the equivalent of entering the cold and flu season, making them vulnerable to disease.

  • Shelburne concert organizers, donors deserve praise

    It’s never easy to pull off something as difficult as a music concert. If it was easy, many people would be doing it.

    That, in itself, makes what Joani Clark did in bringing some Nashville music to Lawrenceburg Friday night so special.

    While a day of rain considerably hurt the turnout for Nashville Live on the Green, there is no doubt the event was a huge success.