.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • A wall of Trump’s own making

    I’ve hit a wall of my own making.

    I started jogging before Christmas, and though I could not complete even 1 mile without walking some, I decided to sign up for my first half marathon on April 1.

    With zero experience running long distances and not bothering to research training regimens, I figured three months would be plenty of time to get to 13 miles. I would work hard. I was committed. Piece of proverbial cake.

  • Live in Taylorsville? I don’t think so

    Taylorsville is a neat little community, but I sure wouldn’t want to live there.

    Here’s why: A front page story in last week’s edition of The Spencer Magnet chronicled how a teenager housesitting for friends cowered in a bathroom after hearing someone breaking into the house. The teen called 911 but, because law enforcement in Spencer County is a full-blown Dumpster fire these days, the first officers to arrive were troopers who traveled there from Anderson County.

  • Throwing some shade on safety report

    Column as I see ’em …

    While admittedly running the risk of sounding like President Trump poo-pooing intelligence reports from the nation’s spooks, I nevertheless have to throw some shade on the Transportation Cabinet’s safety study on Highway 151.

  • Let the gardening season begin

    It’s spring, so let’s indulge in all things green.

    We can begin with a green thumb. Those who believe they lack said thumb need only do two things. The first is put the plant in light, where you will see it a lot, every day. The second is to water it when the soil is no longer damp. Try it.

    There is a lot of green sprouting up in the yard. I have patches of deep green and spots of yellow green. The yellow green tells me the acid is high in the soil there, so it is a good spot for some acid-loving plants, or a healthy dose of agricultural lime.

  • Charter schools among legislation designed to improve education

    Each of us had a school teacher who we still remember today. That teacher may have spent extra time helping us hone a skill we needed a little more time to learn. Or maybe he or she was a listening ear when we couldn’t find one anywhere else.

  • Here are keys to manage frost damage in your alfalfa stands

    First, it is important to understand that determining the temperature that alfalfa stands were exposed to during a frost event is less than exact science.

    Air temperature reported by local news stations likely uses data logged at a weather station that was installed according to National Weather Service guidelines. These guidelines state that sensors should be installed on level terrain, away from paved or concrete surfaces and upright structures, 4 to 6 feet above the soil surface, and in a radiation shield.

  • Legislature needs to stop going soft on heroin dealers

     

  • Want a cheerleader? Look somewhere else

    Column as I see ’em …

    As a customer of the city’s water and sewer department, I was happy report about the federal grant that will shave off nearly half of the debt the city was about to incur for the $2 million sewer project in Alton.

  • Same bands, different tastes leave Marching Bearcats hungry again

    It was somewhat fitting that the final performance of the 2016 season for the Anderson County High School Marching Band would come at a place named for a pizza empire.

    I’ll take the ham and pineapple. You can have pepperoni and mushrooms.

    We can both be happy.After having some pizza — Really, what else can you eat at Papa John’s Cardinal Stadium? — the Marching Bearcats were just ready to finally claim that elusive big trophy they have been chasing the last five years.

    It was to be their year, you know.

  • School district will recover from Goodlett’s arrest

    It’s been a difficult few weeks for LaRue County Public Schools, whether you work there, attend one of the schools, are a parent of a student or graduated from the district.

    For certain, the district has enjoyed brighter days.

    When those in leadership positions take missteps, it can shake a level of confidence. That’s what we see today at LaRue County, a district that is shaken, yet far, far from being crushed.