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Columns

  • Why animal lovers should think twice about helping on the highway

    Emma Czornobaj, a Quebec native and self-professed animal lover, was found guilty Friday on two counts of criminal negligence for allegedly causing a crash that killed two people after stopping in the middle of a highway to rescue ducklings in 2010.

    According to buzzfeed.com, motorcyclist Andre Roy and his daughter Jessie slammed into Czornobaj’s parked car while she stopped on a highway to save ducklings when she did not see their mother. She intended to take them home and care for them.

  • Taking away the car keys: Talking first will help the transition

    The number of older drivers is on the rise.

    The number of adult children who are concerned about their parent’s driving ability and safety on the road is increasing.

    It’s hard to start a conversation about taking away the car keys. Caregivers worry about upsetting the parent and may not have access to alternative transportation.

    This isn’t a new subject but it just hasn’t gotten any easier to have this discussion.

  • Fireflies and honeybees take center stage on summer evenings

    Lightening bugs and tree frogs! I love them both!

    This is the time of year when 9 p.m. doesn’t seem so late. Many of us are just coming in the house at dusk to eat supper.

    Once you’ve filled your tummy, then take those weary bones back outside to the lawn chairs. Don’t let the TV get you because it’s Mother Earth’s audio/visual hour!

    While I love my morning wake up calls from my feathered friends, the sounds of the evening soothe me like no other.

  • Corn earworm can present a serious risk to several crops

    Corn earworms can be a serious pest of a number of crops, including sweet corn, tomatoes (a.k.a. tomato fruitworm), field corn and soybeans (a.k.a. soybean podworm).

    In years following a mild winter, we can have high levels of corn earworm that are able to survive in our soils as immatures. The result can be high populations early in the year. 

    However, this past winter we did not have a mild winter due to the Polar Vortex. So, overwintering survival of corn earworm was very low, and early season risk should be very low.

  • Recycling is a good thing that can only get better in time

    I’ve scratched my head so much these days that I’m sure my coworkers think I have dandruff.

    I don’t.

    What I have is a case of befuddlement.

    While looking up information about the county’s recycling program, I found negative references, critical letters and plenty of sour attitudes toward the infant program.

    Puzzling, at least to me.

  • Every family has been affected by cancer

    According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about eight million people die worldwide from cancer.

    The 1,000 luminaries lined around the American Legion Park Friday night for Relay for Life was a testament to fact that cancer touches every family in some fashion.

    My family is no exception.

    My grandfather John Smith died 4 years ago of lymphatic cancer. He was 78 years old.

    Seeing all the luminaries of mostly individuals who lost their battle to cancer made me miss my grandfather terribly.

  • Extension service offers fall prevention program to help seniors

    Falling in one’s home causes many life-threatening injuries and jeopardizes the independence for over one-third of Kentucky’s senior population, individuals 65 and older, each year.

    Falls don’t have to be a part of growing older. Many fall related injuries are preventable. Health and independence can be preserved by lowering the risk of falls.

    According to the Kentucky Safe Aging Coalition, older Kentuckians should follow these guidelines to help prevent falls:

    •Exercise regularly to increase strength and improve balance.

  • These natural remedies help keep plants lovely all summer long

    If you were a vegetable, what would you be? There are a blue million of these kinds of thing surfing the web right now. They supposedly give insight on the kind of human being you are.

    Would you be a carrot because you like to go deep? How about a tomato because you’re always turning red?

    Oh, how about a melon because they are prone to spread? It’s a lot of silliness but most at least make you smile.

  • Livestock face flies are persistent pests and should be kept down

    Face flies are one of the most difficult pasture pests to control because they are on animals for just a short time and land mainly on the face.

    Face flies use an abrasive sponging mouthpart to stimulate tear flow from the eyes. These flies lap up the protein rich secretions from the eye as well as nasal discharges, saliva, or blood oozing from wounds.

    The face fly is mostly off of animals, resting on plants, fence posts, or other objects. A good control program should keep face fly numbers below 10 per head.

  • God’s message doesn’t need improving, it needs to be believed

    According to a Gallup poll, more than 75 percent of Americans say that religion is losing its’ influential ground in our society.

    On the other hand, we live in a nation where we have well over 300,000 congregations that identify themselves as Christian and over 75 percent of Americans who identify themselves as Christian.

    How do we explain this?

    The answer is that the secularization of society is happening at a break-neck pace. Massive moral shifts are taking place as the world views of our friends and neighbors become increasingly irreligious.