• The Good, Bad and the Ugly


    Column as I see ’em …

    After beating the heat over the weekend by watching Clint Eastwood in “Gran Torino” (his best effort since “The Outlaw Josey Wales”), I’ll pay an homage to old Dirty Harry himself with my own version of the Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

    The good: Anderson County Health Department

  • Gardeners need to beware of ticks

    Like most folks, I am a creature of habit.

    It’s comforting to know something will always be the same, so you can count on it. Change is something that likes to really mess with comfort. I know in my head, that change is good. It keeps us on our toes and forces us to learn new things. Lifelong learner that I am, I really like that last part, but unless I’m really interested in learning it, it usually takes a chair and a whip.

  • Growing peppers? Better be on lookout out for bacterial spot

    Kentucky vegetable growers should be on the lookout for bacterial spot of pepper this week.

    As the most common disease of pepper in Kentucky, homeowners or growers not actively using preventative practices will likely experience at least some bacterial spot.

  • Story behind the story

    When the story of the “mystery photo” (See page A1) landed in my lap a few weeks ago, I was in a spot that reporters rarely find themselves — a part of the story. Rather than simply stating the facts, asking questions and writing from an outsider’s standpoint, I found I was a character in the story.

    Of course, as all this was unfolding, I was never really certain if I had a story or not.

  • Farm, home safety tips for stormy weather

    It’s that time of year when we get more thunderstorms. Weather patterns are more active, and storms thrive with the moisture and rapidly rising warm air that is very common during the transition to warmer seasons.

    Stormy conditions also increase the potential for lightning to strike people at work or play outdoors and, possibly, while they’re inside a building. Although thunderstorms are more common during the spring and summer, they can take place all year long and at all hours.

  • Vacation leads to memory recall

    I took a vacation.

    Besides a few one day-ers in my Hoosier hometown, I’ve taken exactly two vacations in 20 years of living in Kentucky. I took three days to meet up with a Phoenix friend in Pennsylvania almost four years ago, and, last week, I headed west again. It was wonderful.

    The plan was to be in Bakersfield, California for the birth of a child. My friend Anne, who used to own the Mt. Eden Greenhouse, had a new husband for me to meet and was expecting their first baby any day. Baby Lucas had his own plans.

  • Waiting to see what OSHA does with morgue

    Column as I see ’em …

    I’d like to be a fly on the wall when folks in the state’s omnipresent labor cabinet get a glimpse of the article in this week’s paper about the county morgue. (See A1).

    Those folks don’t mess around when it comes to OSHA compliance, and for good reason. People have every expectation that their workplaces are relatively free of preventable hazards, and without those pesky OSHA types beating the bushes looking for violations, that expectation wouldn’t be met nearly as often.

  • Everyone’s opinions are welcome here

    Column as I see ’em …

    I admittedly cringed a bit when I posted on our Facebook page a guest column written by high school junior Caylee Godby that appeared in last week’s paper.

    Godby did an admirable job in explaining her viewpoints on the rights of transgendered people, and did so in a respectful, well thought out manner. My fear was that not everyone would respond similarly on Facebook.

  • Election success was a team effort

    Another election has come and gone.

    Even though we experienced a large voter turnout than originally thought, we had very few issues.

    The state average was around 17 percent and we say approximately a 26 percent turnout. As usual, the Attorney General’s Office visited several of the voting locations looking for voter fraud and election officer compliance. To our knowledge, none was found.

    I want to thank several for helping make election day go so well.

    I will start with my staff.

  • Seat belt campaign a crash course in reality

    For anyone who complains about getting a ticket for not buckling up when driving or riding in a motor vehicle, here’s a crash course in reality:

    In 2015, 761 people were killed on Kentucky’s roadways. Of those 761 killed, 588 were motor vehicle fatalities.

    Of those 588 motor vehicle fatalities, 300 (61 percent) were not wearing a seat belt.

    In 2015, 31 children age 15 and under were killed in motor vehicles on Kentucky roadways. Seventeen (55 percent) of those were unrestrained.