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Columns

  • No need to wait for spring to grow food

    I believe this is the most restful winter I’ve had in Kentucky. Honest to John, I’ve not had to hike up and down the hill, chop or carry much wood, or shovel paths so I can get up and down the drive. I’ve even gained weight.

    The calendar tells me I won’t have much more of this, so I’m taking full advantage now. Lounging around, paging through seed catalogues and listening to books is my idea of a good day. Free time is a rare gem to be appreciated and I do.

  • Resolution Restart Online Challenge begins Jan. 25

    Are you trying to rescue a failed New Year’s resolution? It’s only the sixth day of the 2016 but it happens.

    It has been well documented that when people monitor their behavior and measure how they are doing, they are often inspired to do better and achieve positive results.

    The Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service is launching an online Small Steps to Health and Wealth (SSHW) Challenge called “Kentucky 2016 Resolution Restart.” This free four-week program is designed to help you improve both your health and personal finance behaviors.

  • Public pensions top state legislature’s agenda

    By James Tipton, State Representative

    When the 2016 session of the General Assembly convened Jan. 5 the unfunded liability crisis facing our Public Pension Systems was front and center. During my first year in the legislature, I have spent many hours reviewing the history of how this situation came about and studying options as we move forward.

  • Vaccine good first step to prevent calf scours

    Neonatal calf diarrhea is defined as scours when it occurs within the first three weeks of a calf’s life.

    Bacteria, viruses and parasites can attack the lining of the calf’s intestine and cause diarrhea.

    The decrease in absorption of essential nutrients from milk leads to weight loss and dehydration. If the disease level is severe, calves often die, but even calves that survive will perform poorly for the remainder of their lives when compared to healthy calves.

  • Need a healthful hobby? Try gardening

    Happy 2016 to all. The holidays are over and life is returning to what passes for normal. For some, this is a depressing time of year. May I recommend gardening? Gardening is one of the most healthful hobbies you can have.

    Though just starting seeds indoors doesn’t provide for much physical activity, it will potentially lower your blood pressure, increase your mental acuity and reduce your stress. And there is also the reward factor of watching positive growth.

  • Fruit and vegetable conference set for Jan. 4-5

    The 2016 Kentucky Fruit and Vegetable Conference will have something of interest for all fruit and vegetable producers.

    The event runs from 8 a.m. Jan. 4 until 5 p.m. Jan. 5 at Lexington’s Embassy Suites Hotel.

    Preconference activities on Jan. 3 will include tree fruit, small fruit, and vegetable roundtable discussions.

  • When grandchildren become caregivers

    My daughter helps my mother frequently.

    She enjoys taking her grocery shopping, to get her hair cut, and other errands. They’ve made cookies together this holiday season. My daughter isn’t considered a caregiver, just a loving granddaughter. She lives about 15 minutes from my mother and I live about 15 hours away.

  • Apples, sweet potatoes make perfect pair

    Try something different this year when planning your holiday meals. Add more fruits and vegetables, which also adds more nutrition. Your family may love them and start a new tradition.

    Apples and sweet potatoes make a tasty combination. They are two of nature’s great nutritional gifts, and even the wrapping is edible. They are low in calories, fat, and sodium. They are cholesterol free and are an excellent source of fiber.

    They also contain many of the phyto-chemicals that research shows may play an important role in preventing disease.

  • Tips to keep children safe in the kitchen during holidays

    Holidays are a busy time in the kitchen for many families. Gifts are made, special foods are prepared and unfamiliar foods may be within reach of children. Parents need to be careful about the foods available to the children.

    Keep small, chopped foods - choking hazards – away from children under two. This may include chopped vegetables such as raw carrots, broccoli and cauliflower. Cherry tomatoes or grape tomatoes should also be out of reach for children under two.

  • Can lawn be eco friendly and attract bees?

    Researchers in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment are looking for ways for home lawns to give Mother Nature a helping hand.

    Gregg Munshaw, UK turf extension specialist, and Dan Potter, UK entomology professor, are studying the benefits of white clover as a habitat for pollinators and as a way to reduce nitrogen fertilizer applications.