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Editorials

  • Let’s elect next highway foreman

    Column as I see ’em …

    With county highway foreman Billy Powell Catlett retiring soon, this is the perfect opportunity for Anderson County to lead the way in making that an elected position.

    That might sound crazy, calling for yet another political office, but it’s actually the sanest and most logical way to have that office function.

  • Medicaid costs will hit you in the wallet

    Column as I see ’em …

    It remains to be seen what changes Gov. Bevin plans to make to the expanded Medicaid plan his predecessor shoved down Kentucky’s throat, but here’s hoping it’s a little less expensive for those actually paying for it.

    Giving health care to people who truly can’t afford it isn’t a bad thing. Having those who have to pay for it, though, shell out the kind of bucks it’s currently costing, is.

  • Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

    Editor’s note: The following was written by Francis P. Church and was first published in The New York Sun in 1897. Church married shortly after the editorial appeared. He died in April, 1906, leaving no children.

    Virginia O’Hanlon went on to graduate from Hunter College with a Bachelor of Arts degree at age 21.

    Virginia O’Hanlon Douglas died on May 13, 1971, at the age of 81, in a nursing home in Valatie, New York.

  • Hello, Rosie, goodbye stupid recycling bins

    Column as I see ’em …

    It was with no small amount of pleasure that I sat through a meeting Monday night that will drive yet another nail into the county’s recycling program, hopefully for good.

    A group called Bluegrass Greensource invited me to sit in, not as a reporter but as someone who might be willing to share his views on how to implement a program that calls for Republic Services to provide curbside pickup of recyclables.

  • Cases show tough talk on guns rings hollow

    Column as I see ’em …

    The above classic from the New York Sun that I print each year generally gives me a week off from writing a column, but I just couldn’t keep my mouth shut this week about a couple of things that are boiling my beans.

    As those who regularly spend time with me here each week already know, I’m a proponent of the Second Amendment and hate it when would-be gun grabbers talk about creating more laws, particularly when the ones already on the books are so pathetically enforced.

  • Dinner with Chrismans, Goodletts a privilege

    Column as I see ’em …

    A guy whose opinion I covet more than most once told me that being a journalist comes with a remarkable amount of responsibility intertwined with incredible privilege.

    The privilege portion was on full display Saturday night when I had the chance to enjoy the Anderson County Chamber of Commerce’s annual Christmas gala dinner with two very special families.

  • Sending Florida pennies for its thoughts

    Column as I see ’em ...

    If it weren’t enough that I returned home from Florida a few weeks ago worried sick about my dad, a couple of days later I got a letter from the Florida Department of Transportation telling me I had to pay a $3.28 fine for not paying a highway toll.

  • Poor turnout tells politicians we don’t care

    I don’t think very many of us saw this one coming.

    Privately, I had told a very few close friends that I thought Matt Bevin was going to be the next governor of Kentucky, but that we might not know until the early hours of Nov. 4, the day after we had the opportunity to go to the polls.

    A statewide margin of less than 10,000 votes either way would not have been a surprise and the lingering question would have been the effect of a third-party candidate.

  • Hoping to see Matt ride at least one more time

    I gingerly held my dad’s hand as he laid in a hospital bed watching Marshal Matt Dillon tear across the TV screen aboard his trusty horse.

    His body weakened by cancer and a calamity of other illnesses ranging from pneumonia to staph infections, watching episodes of the old TV show “Gunsmoke” seemed to give my dad something else to consider rather than what has become of the rugged body that had not once betrayed him until just after he turned 75.

  • Police lives apparently don’t matter after all

    Column as I see ’em …

    Deputy Loren Wells won’t quit.

    Neither will troopers Matt Rogers, Brian Smith, Luke Vanhoose, Jeff Gabby or Jack Gabriel.

    But I would.

    After someone fired magazine after magazine at me from an AK-47 and other firearms, I’d turn in my police gear and go home.