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Editorials

  • City’s restaurant tax still a very bad idea

    By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    The old saw that when the cat’s away the mice will play is sadly all too true.

    After spending years beating back the misguided notion that taxing restaurants will somehow attract tourists — who doesn’t want to pay more for food? — those bent on some kind of a weird restaurant tax caliphate quickly got up to their old tricks not long after I left this job in February for one in New Mexico.

  • 09-10 No Energy Cartoon
  • Brough a good hire for tourism, but …

    By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    It’s encouraging to see the tourism commission actually making some headway by hiring a paid executive director who will, ostensibly, make sure tourism is paid something aside from lip service.

    Pam Brough was hired for that job, which is similar to the one she already has as president of the chamber of commerce. She is obviously a solid choice for the position, but her selection does give one reason to pause.

  • Cartoon: Michelle for Senate
  • Election night shatters pomposity, Democrats

    Column as I see ’em …

    By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    It’s fairly rare that I’m at a loss for words.

    Driving home Tuesday night after watching the local Democrat party suffer what has to be the worst defeat in its history (I’d soon learn that the rest of America’s Democrats did roughly the same), I can’t say I was shocked over who won here, but the margins were stunning.

  • The Lawrenceburg man who nearly became president

    James Beauchamp “Champ” Clark was born near Lawrenceburg on March 7, 1850. As a boy he worked on farms in Anderson County. By the time he was 62 years old he had become the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, was the ranking Democrat official in the nation, and the leading Democratic candidate for president going into the 1912 Democrat nominating convention.

  • When misinformation leads to mistrust

    As Americans, we often rely on the expertise of others to make an informed decision. If you have cancer, you visit an oncologist to give you variety of options on how to treat the disease. If you car isn’t running properly, you take it to a mechanic. If you have chronic soreness and stiffness, people often visit a chiropractor. With the same logic, we trust the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be experts in the spread of contagions and limiting the spread of contagious diseases such as Ebola.

  • Nightmare brewing for local Democrats?

    By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    If the interviews I’ve conducted over the past couple of weeks are any indication, Thursday’s candidate forum at the middle school has the potential to be informative and entertaining.

  • 10-15 cartoon
  • Save bucks this winter by canning your own veggies

    It’s “close” outside, as Grandma would say. Close is the term she used for humid. I have no idea why, but it does feel like someone wrapped you in a damp towel. I will be glad when the humidity drops, but not the temperature.