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Editorials

  • Students ignite journalism fire

    To be a journalist is like being on fire.  
    Extinguish one flame — deadlines, disgruntled readers or writer’s block — and more start to smolder in its place.
    I’ve toured a prison and endured its pat-down policy, been essentially banned from a senior center, and had my student newspaper pulled from the racks for publishing a story about an Ecstasy drug bust on campus.
    So it’s nice to remind myself sometimes why I voluntarily chose this profession.
    All it took was another newspaper.

  • Time for Gov. Beshear to reign in health cabal

    Column as I see ’em …
    Now that he has been comfortably re-elected, perhaps Gov. Beshear will take a moment and throw a rope around those in his health cabinet who can’t seem to keep their meddling noses out of Anderson County’s business.
    Our 12-person health board, which consists of the county’s CEO and members with more degrees than a thermometer is perfectly capable (these days, at least) of making decisions without interference from state health officials.

  • Your attendance is requested

    I’m an expert in attending meetings.
    And you should be, too.  
    Contrary to common knowledge, things happen at those public meetings.
    I know that’s a pretty big shock. You might want to sit down for a moment.
    Money exchanges hands, new policies and ordinances up for review and passage.
    I should know. I write about them.

  • Bad apples spoiling Southwestern’s barrel

    Column as I see ’em …
    Somerset, home of the Southwestern football team Anderson spanked so badly Friday night to advance to the state finals, is apparently home to a few rather sore losers.
    It was bad enough that one of Southwestern’s assistant coaches had to be booted out for mouthing off to a referee, but he really went over the top when he apparently flipped the bird to Anderson fans while leaving the field.
    Who does he think he is? Jets coach Rex Ryan?

  • Spotting the Wienermobile on the Bourbon Trail

    This isn’t bat country.
    It’s Wienermobile country.
    Much like native son Hunter S. Thompson, I thought some sort of hallucination had started to take hold when I saw a 27-foot hot dog car from my driver’s seat.
    Thanks to a tip from a reader who first spotted the vehicle, I learned about life on the road from behind the wheel of a hot dog.
    For “hotdoggers” and Wisconsinites Kylie Hodges and Dylan Hackbarth, Oscar Mayer hot dogs paved the way for their year-long road trip with the Wienermobile.

  • Delivering results that are just too good

    I bumped into a frustrated fellow Monday night who wanted a help wanted ad he purchased pulled from this week’s paper.
    Seems the ad, which ran last week for a minimum wage, temporary position, had generated so many phone calls that his phone was ringing almost non-stop.
    “I can’t take it anymore,” he said. “Just today we’ve received 40 calls.”
    I told the fellow I’d do what I can to oblige even though it was well past our normal advertising deadline.

  • The grand experiment

    Once, there was a grand experiment.
    Psychologists ushered a person into a little room with a one-way mirror and a simple switchboard.
    Levers indicated electric shock levels from low to debilitating.  
    The man in the white lab coat offered basic instructions: read questions to the man or woman you can’t see behind the mirror.
    For each wrong answer, buzz them with an electric shock.
    The more wrong answers, the more intense the current.  

  • UK mishandling sports reporters

    George Orwell’s 1949 tome on political repression, “1984,” told of Oceania, a fictional society ruled by Big Brother that bugged the phones of its citizens and practiced strict mind control.
    Orwell would have loved the University of Kentucky, the publicly funded institution that recently banned the Kentucky Kernel, its independent campus newspaper, from covering its annual invitation-only media day.

  • Tony Soprano would love a racket like this

    Want the real news that surfaced from last Thursday night’s health board meeting?
    No, it isn’t that the director got over and kept his job, albeit on a part-time basis.
    Instead, it’s that despite all the bluster the judge-executive who wanted him fired could muster, the board doesn’t have the ability to fire the director.
    Oh, it can vote to fire him but that becomes reality only if the decision isn’t vetoed by the state health board, re: Dr. Steve Davis, its acting director.

  • A case for, against health director

    The Anderson County Board of Health will likely decide the fate of embattled health director Brandon Hurley when it meets Thursday night.
    This newspaper has not endorsed keeping him or firing him, and will not do so here. Instead, we’ll examine the pros and cons of each.
    First some background. Hurley has been health director for about three years. Soon after he came aboard, the health board — an unelected group of residents with varied professional backgrounds — continued a decade-long discussion on whether to construct a new building.