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Editorials

  • Dunked and dunked and dunked again

    Column as I see ’em ...
    It took all of three throws from Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway for me to go from brash and cocky to soaking wet.
    After harassing him for several weeks in the paper and insinuating he couldn’t throw straight, Conway was first in line Friday night to shut me up and ensure he was the first to dunk me in the Little League dunking booth during the fair.
    He was far from the only one. Person after person lined up through the night, in part to make me drink my words and in part to help a Little League player with cancer.

  • Sheriff understands how to shop local

    Sheriff Troy Young seeks out my approval about as much as a cat seeks out a bubble bath.
    His approval is the province of the voters, and like you, I get only one vote each four years.
    I do, however, get to comment with regularity on how the keepers of our tax dollars function, and if Rory McIlroy is the new standard-bearer for golf, the sheriff is likewise now the standard-bearer for how to spend our money.

  • Relay gives hope new meaning

    Close your eyes, and picture hope.
    Harder than it reads, isn’t it?
    Hope is a thing intangible, like you’re trying to pin down a wisp of smoke.
    We lose hope, raise hopes, hope against hope. But like its abstract cousins love, jealousy and forgiven ess, it’s easier to say the words than to wrap our minds around exactly what hope is.

  • Time to stop ignoring white-collar crime

    Column as I see ’em …
    The story I wrote this week about the attorneys in the Beasmore trial not having city and county business licenses isn’t meant to embarrass or single them out.
    Instead, it’s to highlight the fact that far too many companies that don’t have offices here skirt the law that requires them to be properly licensed.
    And what really burns my biscuits is that it appears the majority of those practice white-collar professions.

  • Want to knock me off my pedestal?

    Column as I see ’em …
    “Am I that detestable?” I asked a friend. “Do you really think people would pay money to throw baseballs at me and knock me into a tank of water?”
    “Yes,” he said. “Given the things you write, there are people who will empty their bank accounts to buy chances to throw balls at you, just on the odd chance that one will bust through the screen and hit you in your big mouth.”

  • Freedom Hall really was about freedom on Saturday

    I was in Freedom Hall the night Anderson County played for the state basketball championship. It was the place where I heard Muhammad Ali say he wanted to fight George Foreman and Joe Frazier on the same night.


    I saw Julius Erving, then of the Virginia Squires, do things with a basketball that I had never seen and still can’t describe. I have been to several concerts there and I watched Richie Farmer make string music the state finals 23 years ago.

  • Ticket better than scolding any day

    As opposed to chronicling this week what I perceive to be the misdeeds of others, allow me instead to discuss a couple of my own.
    Twice in the past month I’ve attracted the attention of law enforcement, and not for good reasons. A few weeks back, I got stuck around 4 a.m. at the traffic light at the intersection of US 127 Bypass and Glensboro Road while heading to work. It was Tuesday, my early day, and I was most definitely in a hurry.

  • These people died so you can do something else on Memorial Day

    I intended to give a mild tongue-lashing this week to those too busy shoving hot dogs and beer into the faces to attend Sunday’s Memorial Day service at the Healing Field.
    Instead, I’ve decided to save the outraged editor act for another week, and provide the names of the Kentucky soldiers killed in the war on terror who are commemorated at the Healing Field (13 more were added Sunday), along with the names of local veterans killed in wars dating back to World War I.

  • No penance for $400K mistake

    It’s a downright shame that those on the Anderson County Board of Health who voted to approve the new health department building near Walmart can’t be held personally responsible for squandering $400,000 in taxpayer money.
    Of course unlike the taxpayers who have no choice but to pay for their mistakes, they’re immune from such accountability.

  • Leadership needed on cemetery issue

    When the Greek philosopher Aristotle famously quipped, “Nature abhors a vacuum,” he probably didn’t have the mayor of Lawrenceburg in mind.
    Were he alive today, though, that’s probably just what he’d think about the leadership vacuum that exists regarding the mayor’s cemetery debacle.