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Editorials

  • Higher broccoli prices would help save lives

    Column as I see ’em …
    Did you know that every single person who eats broccoli will die?
    It’s absolutely true, as is the case for anyone who eats carrots, peas or even a sweet ear of corn.
    I won’t explain these facts, but if you think about them for a few minutes, you’ll conclude I’m correct.
    No, this isn’t me picking on vegetables, although broccoli is truly disgusting. Instead, it’s to point out the frailties often associated with medical reports.

  • The GOP’s ‘Amazing Race’

    I love reality shows.
    Especially presidential elections.
    For most of us who follow politics, it seems as though we’re beginning an unnecessary fifth season of “The Amazing Race Political Survivor: Iowa and New Hampshire,” not diving into the infancy of the 2012 presidential race.
    I’m already exhausted by the debates, the practiced on-camera smiles and blind predictions for the Republican Party nominee.  
    But somehow, I can’t look away, like one of those bug-eating episodes of “Fear Factor.”

  • Paying public has the right to know

    Column as I see ’em …
    The health board has created a committee to figure out how to financially salvage itself from itself, and it’s with no small amount of frustration that I’m unable to share with you how that process is going.
    When it met last week, the committee promptly went into a closed session, emerged and adjourned without so much as a peep.
    Public agencies have the right to discuss their business in private only when it involves property negotiations, or hiring, firing and disciplining employees.

  • City wise to create travel policy

    “It’s the way we’ve always done it.”
    If I had a nickel for every time I’ve heard that response — well, I’d have a lot of nickels.
    I don’t want to make a mountain out of a seemingly insignificant city government oversight.  
    But frankly, I’m surprised city officials thought using the “honor system” in relation to reimbursing its employees was an effective and realistic tradition to uphold.

  • Will 2012 be better? Only time will tell

    Column as I see ’em …
    Agree or disagree with the order in which they appear, or if they should have been on the list at all, the stories that comprise this year’s top 10 certainly show that Anderson County had its share of ups and downs in 2011.

  • New year brings new worries

    I work hard at developing wrinkles and gray hair.
    It’s a by-product of my favorite hobby — worrying.
    With a tumultuous year coming to a close and (if we can rely on the accuracy of the Mayan calendar) perhaps the world as we know it in 2012, there’s a lot to bite our nails over.
    Should the world end in either fire or ice in 2012, I can at least check off a few 2011 happenings here at home and around the world from my worrywart agenda.

    Life after Oprah

  • More jobs, less taxes and ban on fake pot

    Wish in one hand, spit in the other because in the end it generally amounts to the same thing.
    I shall nevertheless toss out some some wishes for the new year, minus all the “whirled peas” pablum that generally makes these kind of columns remarkably boring.
    Instead, I’ll focus on things that could actually happen here.

    Economic growth in Anderson County
    Nothing will fix our area’s immediate economic concerns better than companies already here growing and hiring more people.

  • Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

    Editor’s note: The following was written by Francis P. Church and was first published in The New York Sun in 1897. Church married shortly after the editorial appeared. He died in April 1906, leaving no children. Virginia O’Hanlon went on to graduate from Hunter College with a Bachelor of Arts degree at age 21. Virginia O’Hanlon Douglas died on May 13, 1971, at the age of 81, in a nursing home in Valatie, N.Y.

  • Don’t forget about things that genuinely matter

    Someday, I’m going to be famous.
    Probably not for my own merits or intellect.
    Lord knows that those things would get me nowhere.
    I’ll be famous for as long as it takes to watch a video, repeat a headline or blink an eye.
    After all, that’s as long as most important issues remain in the American consciousness.

  • Answering unanswered historic district questions

    Usually, I ask the questions.
    This time, however, I thought I’d attempt to answer objectively some of the questions that came up during the historic district commission public hearing Dec. 6.
    After speaking with members of the commission, as well as with representatives from the Bardstown historic district and the Kentucky Heritage Council, these are the answers I received:

    Q: Who is included?