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Editorials

  • These people died so you can do something else on Memorial Day

    I intended to give a mild tongue-lashing this week to those too busy shoving hot dogs and beer into the faces to attend Sunday’s Memorial Day service at the Healing Field.
    Instead, I’ve decided to save the outraged editor act for another week, and provide the names of the Kentucky soldiers killed in the war on terror who are commemorated at the Healing Field (13 more were added Sunday), along with the names of local veterans killed in wars dating back to World War I.

  • No penance for $400K mistake

    It’s a downright shame that those on the Anderson County Board of Health who voted to approve the new health department building near Walmart can’t be held personally responsible for squandering $400,000 in taxpayer money.
    Of course unlike the taxpayers who have no choice but to pay for their mistakes, they’re immune from such accountability.

  • Leadership needed on cemetery issue

    When the Greek philosopher Aristotle famously quipped, “Nature abhors a vacuum,” he probably didn’t have the mayor of Lawrenceburg in mind.
    Were he alive today, though, that’s probably just what he’d think about the leadership vacuum that exists regarding the mayor’s cemetery debacle.

  • Editorial: A fungus among us

    Help wanted

  • Get tough on owners of dilapidated homes

    We generally loathe the idea of government at any level sticking its bureaucratic nose into people’s lives, but will gladly support any effort from county government to take action against the owners of abandoned, dilapidated homes.
    A perfect example is the home on Hammond Road that is the subject of an article on page A1. It has been abandoned for years, has bags of trash falling out of its broken front windows, has floors and ceilings that are caving in, and is an eyesore of the first order.

  • Pay teachers we need, not the ones we don’t

    The Anderson County Board of Education cannot hope to obtain and retain the best and brightest teachers by continuing to employ even one teacher too many.
    News last week that the district employs, by its own staffing formula, 13 teachers it doesn’t need is a slap in the face to every needed teacher in the district.
    They are the ones who had to grovel earlier this year to avoid having the number of days they work reduced, which would amount to a pay cut.
    They are the ones who have lived through pay freezes.

  • EDITORIAL: Can common sense outwit the feds?

    Judge-Executive John Wayne Conway exited the county courthouse Friday morning as an everyman’s hero, fresh off getting restored (for the time being, at least) several polling locations in rural Anderson County.
    Flanked by a couple dozen folks from his own 6th District neck of the woods, Conway spoke from the crowd at the end of the board of elections meeting.

  • EDITORIAL: May we suggest moving to Egypt?

    Those offended by campaign signs should simply move to a country where voting isn’t allowed.
    That’s a much better solution than the one being considered by the fiscal court, which would mandate the length of time campaign signs can be placed on private property.
    Instigated by a handful of indignant people aghast at the number of signs and how long they were present during the previous election cycle, the fiscal court has already passed on first reading an ordinance that would allow signs only 45 days before and seven days after an election.

  • EDITORIAL: City, county merger deserves to be studied

    Only those afraid of what they might find will stand opposed to the creation of a committee to research the viability of merging city and county government.
    We support such a study, and will be mightily disappointed should the city council and fiscal court stand in the way. (Details, A1).
    No one — not the group of people assembled by attorney Walter Patrick or our elected officials — has clue one if such an idea makes practical, common sense.
    Nor does anyone know if the idea would actually save taxpayers one thin dime.

  • EDITORIAL: School board could lead way to shop local

    Tourism honks and others charged with bringing money into a community all seem to agree that when a dollar is spent locally, it will change hands seven additional times.
    Maybe. We haven’t done nor can we site specific research that will prove that theory, but it seems widely accepted among those who have, and who are we to argue?
    Heck, even Jason Denny, the county clerk whose term as president of the chamber of commerce just ended, referenced that theory during Saturday’s chamber gala at Eagle Lake while encouraging people to shop locally.