.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • Beggars can’t be choosers with pipeline grants

    An extra $50,000 for school safety is a needed $50,000, even if it comes courtesy of the controversial Bluegrass Pipeline.
    A few weeks ago it seemed no public agency in Anderson County would dare touch pipeline money through the Bluegrass Pipeline Community Grant Program.
    Looks like the school district has, and staff has confirmed that applications were submitted late last week for two $25,000 pipeline grants.
    That’s a good thing for the school district, and here’s why.

  • Diversions provide excuses for another late state budget

    Any takers on a bet that state lawmakers again this year won’t be able to agree to a budget within their allotted 60 days?
    Didn’t think so, not with the mish-mash of problems that are sure to divide and ultimately conquer legislators more worried about the coming election than actually fixing Kentucky’s budget woes.
    As if taking a cue from their compatriots in Washington, DC, look for legislators on both sides of the aisle to seek victory through vitriol in a game of mutually assured destruction for everyone but themselves.

  • Sales tax option best of two evils

    There will be a push in the coming year to amend Kentucky’s constitution and allow municipalities to enact a local sales tax option up to 1 percent.
    If OK’d by the legislature, a statewide vote would determine if the fiscal court or city council here would be allowed to enact such a tax.
    Questions about the proposal still outweigh the answers and, while we are almost always loath to support tax increases, this one might be a workable deal for Anderson County.

  • School board should be ashamed of itself

    Column as I see ’em …
    As hard it might be to believe, the least objectionable thing the Anderson County Board of Education did last Wednesday was raise your property tax rates.
    The most objectionable? Blatant dishonesty, bordering on outright lies.
    In a remarkably unconscionable and despicable display, school board members actually used the threat of a “state” takeover of the school system to rationalize raising your taxes.

  • ACLU Bible threat just the beginning

    The American Civil Liberties Union is just getting warmed up, and elected officials running public meetings in Anderson County better dang well listen up and start preparing for the inevitable.
    By warning the school district about Bible distribution by the Gideons, the ACLU has proved its tentacles have no limits, even into a state where most of what that bunch presses for is flatly ignored — outside of Lexington and Louisville, that is.

  • Taxpayers deserve squeaky clean audit

    Last Tuesday’s fiscal court meeting served as the perfect example of why Anderson County continues to receive remarkably poor state audits (see A1).
    During a routine vote to approve budget transfers, Magistrate David Ruggles questioned why some figures being proposed by Treasurer Dudley Shryock didn’t appear to add up.
    Shryock tried several times to explain what was being proposed, but Ruggles simply didn’t understand what he was talking about.

  • Wants trump needs with proposed swimming facility

    Your home needs a new roof, but you want a new fishing boat.
    Your car needs new tires, but you want the latest pair of designer shoes.
    Your child needs braces to straighten her crooked front teeth, but you want to continue buying that six-pack of Bud every night — the cumulative effect of which would cover monthly payments on the braces.
    And so it goes, mankind’s eternal struggle between eating ice cream or broccoli.

  • Obey meeting rules or move along

    Last week’s illegal meeting of a health board committee, however brief, reeks of an attempt to avoid obeying state statutes that govern open meetings.
    Those involved can contend that’s not true, but the evidence suggests otherwise.
    First, the director told this newspaper point blank nearly a month ago that it would not be allowed to attend meetings of this committee.

  • Anderson County owes Todd big debt of gratitude

    Very quietly and without a hint of self-aggrandizement, Harold Todd has become one of the best taxpayer advocates Anderson County has ever seen.
    If that name sounds familiar, it should. A reserved, fairly quiet man who has spent his life crunching numbers as a CPA for the state and establishing a network of rental homes, Todd rose to prominence a couple of years ago when he was tapped by former Judge-Executive Steve Conway to serve on the local board of health in what appeared to be a last-ditch effort to keep it solvent.

  • Searching for fairness in all the wrong places

    The adage “all is fair in love and war” is true, and the Anderson County Fiscal Court should remember that business is a subsidiary of the latter.
    Government, regardless the size, cannot dictate fairness any more than it can dictate morality, including the fiscal court’s ongoing and painful attempt to make its business license ordinance “fair.”
    That was the goal when magistrates spent more than an hour last Tuesday trying to rewrite the ordinance that requires most, but not all, businesses to purchase a license.