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Editorials

  • Tell magistrates to protect Earth and your wallet

    The Anderson County Fiscal Court will have a chance to fix a $320,000 mistake when it meets Nov. 20, and could use a little encouragement between then and now to ensure it does.
    It appears there’s a chance that magistrates who approved spending that amount on a recycling building have since thought better of the idea, and are starting to see government-run recycling for what it really is: a black hole where taxpayer dollars go to die.

  • Recyling building a waste of money

    The fiscal court approved wasting hundreds of thousands of dollars Monday morning to build a recycling building that it doesn’t need.
    No, the magistrates aren’t bent on wasting your tax dollars, but Monday’s vote to spend nearly $320,000 on a building and perhaps thousands more to purchase a 15-year-old trash truck from a community bright enough to get out of the recycling business reeks of two things:
    1) Fear
    2) The desire to stay in elected office, even if it means not doing the right thing.

  • Bad advice on how to cast your vote

    Column as I see ’em …
    If Anderson County wants to get its fair share of state funds, it needs to elect the candidate whose party controls the House.
    That’s not my logic or recommendation; vote for whichever candidate you want. But it is something I’ve been told by a number of politically connected folks around here while discussing the race between incumbent Republican Kim King and challenger Kent Stevens, a Democrat.

  • One reason criminals getting more brazen
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  • Consider the cockroach

    The view from an airplane window made it possible to dream of living in a cloud.
    On Sunday, I found out what living in a cloud was like. I never want to know again.
    The equation is simple. Autumn mornings plus the mixing of cool and warm air over the Kentucky River equals a Tyrone Pike bridge enveloped in a fog so thick you could scoop it into cupped hands.

  • Student fees leave parents steaming

    Column as I see ’em …
    While many folks had visions of steaming pots of burgoo dancing in their heads this past week, others were just steaming over what they consider incessant fees some students are forced to pay to receive their “free” government education.
    I’ve had several complaint calls and visits during the past week or so from parents fuming over high school students having to pay $10 to park their cars and the $50 “student fee,” both hidden taxes disguised as something else.

  • Speeding tickets, not cars are flying on Versailles Road

    Column as I see ’em …
    Let’s kick off this week’s column with a bit of friendly advice.
    If you speed while driving on Versailles Road keep two things close at hand: your driver’s license and enough cash to pay for a speeding ticket.
    Since the tragic death of a Lawrenceburg woman whose mini-van was struck head-on by a dump truck a couple of weeks ago, the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office has been on that road like a duck on a jitterbug.

  • What have you sacrificed?

    Sacrifice.
    To appease the vengeful god known as the “economy,” it’s an imperative to offer our time, money and entertainment as budgetary sacrifices.
    No more vacations.
    Fewer trips to the salon or nail parlor. (There’s actually a direct relationship between the infrequency of haircuts and the depressed status of the economy, according to news reports).
    Want to start a family? If you’re anything like most young people in the U.S., you’ll want to wait.

  • Lower speed limit on Versailles Road now

    Column as I see ’em …
    Reducing the speed limit on Versailles Road isn’t going to bring back Marie Garmon or the other two women killed on that road last fall.
    It isn’t going to un-injure the woman whose car was rear-ended this summer, or any of the others hurt in the mounting number of accidents on that road.
    But it needs to happen, and it needs to happen now.

  • Giving during tough times

    The art of selfless giving is hard to master.
    Especially in 2012.  
    At this same time last year, then-high school junior Blake Roach promised himself that he’d pursue his mission to erect a 9/11 memorial in front of the Anderson County high school, even if he didn’t make his promised groundbreaking deadline of Sept. 11, 2011.
    That deadline long gone, Blake said he hopes he can just see this project through until more final deadline — his graduation in May.