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Editorials

  • More questions than answers about sale of ECC land, building

    Column as I see ’em …
    Count me among the many still scratching their heads at the tremendous deal the Christian Academy got in buying the old Early Childhood Center building and land for $75,100.
    Frankly, I couldn’t be happier for those folks, especially considering the hard work and due diligence they did before making what turned out to be the only bid on that building.

  • Christian Academy schools city council on buying real estate

    Column as I see ’em …
    Congratulations go to the folks from the Christian Academy of Lawrenceburg on their purchase of the old Early Childhood Center.
    That property continuing to be used for educational purposes is ideal.
    And what a bargain! The academy made the only bid on the property and will pay just $75,100 for a 45,500 square foot building and nearly 7.5 acres of land in downtown Lawrenceburg.

  • Born in the USA: Top 10 reasons why we should love being American

    “That’s it. I’m moving to Canada.”
    Whenever we’re displeased or frustrated with the good ‘ol United States of America, we threaten to seek sanctuary in our neighbors to the north.
    Why? Because we just can’t take it anymore: the gas prices, the unemployment and yet another losing season of our favorite sports team (Kentucky basketball aside, of course).

  • Who do you blame when good kids go bad?

    Thirty-five seconds.
    The video kept recording the humiliation for about 10 minutes, but I had seen enough to convince me.  
    What the eye sees, it can’t erase.
    So I procrastinated on viewing the infamous “Making the Bus Monitor Cry” for days. I knew about how horrible it was, and believed all of the outrage.  
    I don’t consider myself a member of the morality police, and typically err on the side of free speech.
    But the middle school boys portrayed in the video were not exercising First Amendment rights.

  • Preparing for return of ‘Flim-Flam Man’

    With our array of taxing districts poised to set tax rates later this summer, it seems only fitting that a 1960s movie titled “The Flim-Flam Man” included scenes shot right here in Lawrenceburg
    That movie featured a pair of drifters who teamed up to gain the confidence of locals while bilking them out of their money. The key, of course, was to never let the local rubes know that they were having their pockets picked, which isn’t all that different than the way the system to raise property taxes works.

  • Where sidewalk ends, city’s responsibility begins

    Look closely at where the sidewalk ends.
    If you’re like me, you usually don’t think about the short drop where the concrete curb’s lip meets the street.
    For Anderson County residents like Lovada Melser, sometimes you’re forced to think of nothing else.
    Melser, who lives in one of the Breckenridge Estates apartments off of US 62, describes herself as an independent woman.
    It bothers her to have to ask people for help, she said.

  • Meet Lawrenceburg’s Hatfields and McCoys

    Have you seen latest television series about the Hatfields and McCoys?
    If not, don’t bother searching it out in reruns because a battle here between city and county government is remarkably entertaining — even without all the bloodshed.
    For our purposes, we’ll make the fiscal court the County Hatfields and the city council the City McCoys. (You’ll find out why shortly.)
    Like the famous families, the County Hatfields and City McCoys have been locked in battle for years, and no one is absolutely certain exactly what caused the ruckus.

  • Resisting the Nanny State

    I don’t like when someone tries to hold my hand.
    Particularly, the government.
    Or really, anyone that makes it his or her business that I mind my own.
    Recent news stories wormed their way into my head the last few weeks, stories that continue to irritate me like bug bites that just won’t stop itching.
    For example, New York.  My birthplace. The land of sea salt air and sand and the most delicious pizza you’ve ever tasted.

  • An eye-opening look at your county tax bill

    It comes in your mailbox every fall, an envelope from the sheriff’s office that contains a yellow slip of paper replete with a dizzying array of numbers.
    If you’re like most people you glance at the bottom line, mumble an expletive or two and shove it into a folder for use when filing an income tax return.
    In these days of 30-year mortgages that include an escrow account for property taxes, an alarming number of people don’t really take a moment to digest that slip of paper, which tells us much more than a grand total.

  • Are we ignoring cancer?

    Cancer has become so common as to be ignored.
    We hear reports about it the news.
    We know it’s the No. 2 killer of American men and women, right behind heart disease.
    We see pink ribbons on bumper stickers, on license plates.
    I feel like the power of hearing a word like “cancer” has been reduced to a dull roar, mixed in with all of the other harmful things that could and might and probably will kill us someday.
    Car accidents.
    Alzheimer’s disease.
    Cancer.