.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • Giving during tough times

    The art of selfless giving is hard to master.
    Especially in 2012.  
    At this same time last year, then-high school junior Blake Roach promised himself that he’d pursue his mission to erect a 9/11 memorial in front of the Anderson County high school, even if he didn’t make his promised groundbreaking deadline of Sept. 11, 2011.
    That deadline long gone, Blake said he hopes he can just see this project through until more final deadline — his graduation in May.

  • Handling of hit list a lesson for district

    Roughly 36 hours. That’s how long it took from the time police took into custody a middle school student suspected of creating a hit list before school officials determined it was OK for you to know about it.
    That’s inexcusable. When something this serious happens, the district should set aside this pervasive and somewhat odd desire it has developed of late to control every ounce of information that gets out and simply let people know what’s going on.

  • Putting a face to the economy

    The economy.
    If you listen closely to the way people talk about the economy, you expect Frankenstein’s monster pieced together from the most terrifying of horror film creatures.
    Like the nameless beast hiding underneath the bed, the economy creates havoc without anyone physically seeing or touching it.
    “The economy” induces enough stress and fear, it seems, to launch a thousand nightmares.
    It starves. It steals. It turns decent people desperate.

  • Will attorney general’s office keep talking tough?

    Column as I see ’em …
    Don’t be surprised this week if a former social services employee who pleaded guilty to nine felony counts of falsifying her investigations is, in essence, released from prison.
    Yep, the five year sentence Margaret “Geri” Murphy received just a month ago could be set aside when she asks for, and odds are will receive, shock probation.

  • The roads less traveled

    Anderson County, I give up.
    Just when I think I know exactly where I’m going and what’s going to happen, you dump me on an impossible, toothpick-thin road with no cell phone service and threatening, moody thunderclouds.
    Last week, Editor Ben Carlson wrote about the city slicker behavior of his pets.
    Well, I’m here to tell you to confess I have something in common with his dachshund.
    I am a city slicker. I am unashamed to admit this, because it’s obviously true.  

  • ECC deal finalized, tax rate debate up next

    Column as I see ’em …
    For those wishing to overturn the school board’s decision to practically give away the old ECC building, forget about it.
    I’ve had numerous calls and conversations with people who were highly agitated that the board sold the building and 7.5 acres of land for $75,100, and held out hope that somehow someone would force them to reconsider.
    Of course nothing could make that happen, and the board closed the deal a couple of weeks ago without so much as a public peep.

  • Apologies to the Class of 2013

    Dear Anderson County high school seniors, Class of 2013:
    I apologize in advance.
    Many of you won’t read this column, because according to some of your elders, you’ve never seen a newspaper.
    For those who decided to engage in the archaic ritual of reading the weekly newspaper, I’d like to extend an apology on behalf of others who believe today’s youth don’t know how to string a sentence together unless it includes text speak like “LOL” or “OMG.”  

  • Who among you will raise a hand in public?

    A private show of hands, please, from those who think that the state Transportation Cabinet’s efforts to use political candidate Kent Stevens to deliver “contingency” road paving funds to Anderson County was not politically motivated in any way. (See story, A1.)
    C’mon, no one’s looking. Even you lifelong Democrats who can’t stand Republicans — especially Republicans like Kim King — can raise your hands.

  • Should we reward teachers based on test scores?

    Once upon a time, students assured themselves an easy school year simply by placing an apple on the teacher’s desk on the first day.
    They could try, anyway.
    But an apple a day won’t keep our good teachers teaching.
    Flashing shiny Apple products in their faces won’t be enough, either.      
    So what incentives can possibly be left for teachers who see year after year of pay freezes and budget cuts?

  • Our mirror is large enough for everyone

    You think you’re holding a newspaper, but in fact it’s a mirror.
    That’s my view, anyway, because my goal each week is to produce a paper that reflects the community it serves, warts and all.
    As you’ll see in a guest column on this page and in Jess Thompson’s column on the church page, there’s an interesting debate going on between a self-described Christian and a self-described atheist.