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Letters

  • Band together to fight tyranny


    To the editor:

    The drug cartels are laughing at us as we keep drugs illegal to insure their profits stay high to fuel our enemies in our own hemisphere toward the destruction of our own country. Usually by our own police and greedy officials who are rapidly destroying our U.S. Constitution with compete impunity.

    They are confiscating our guns, too, in order to prepare us for planned slavery and death.

  • USDA steps up for small farmers

    To the editor:

    On March 10, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced changes to the Farm Storage Facility Loan program that will benefit the growing number of smaller farmers seeking to access opportunities in local and regional food-system growth.

  • Young researcher seeks input

     

    (Editor’s note: The following letter appears as written by the writer, without corrections.)

    To the editor:

    My name is Andrew Wiegers. I am a fifth grader at Napa Valley Language Academy in Napa, California.

  • Support legalization of medical marijuana in Kentucky

    To the editor:

    I’m writing today to ask the citizens of Kentucky to help change the laws regarding medical cannabis in our state. There needs to be common sense, compassionate reform of the law to help the truly disabled and sick people of Kentucky. We have a moral duty to stand up for the rights of our afflicted family and neighbors.

  • LETTER: Tell senators to support HB31 to preserve landowner's rights

    To the editor:

    Do we live in a democracy? The dictionary defines a democracy as a form of  government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised  by them or by their elected agents under a free electoral system.

    The passage of HB 31 by the House was an indication of democracy at work –  a case of private property rights versus corporate interests. This bill  prohibits the use of eminent domain by developers of hazardous natural gas liquids pipelines.

  • Risks posed by Bluegrass Pipeline not worth the price we'll all pay

    Don't believe the Hype

  • Thanks for ‘Toys for Tots’ donations

    To the editor:
    We wish to extend our gratitude and special thanks to all the generous people of Lawrenceburg, for all the money and toys that you gave to the “Toys for Tots” program.
    Without your generous donations many children would have a happy Christmas this year.
    A special thanks to Walmart and Dollar General for allowing us to set up and collect the toys and money. A special thanks to Farmers Bank, Town and County Bank and Trust Co., and Smith’s Grocery for allowing us to put donation containers in their businesses.

  • Politicians aren’t concerned about passing along debt to posterity

    To the editor:
    Politicians in Congress and in the White House often lament, “We’re passing our debt along to our children and grandchildren” or “the full faith and credit of the United States must not be put at risk.” The frequency of their lamentations has reduced the two quotations to meaningless sounds that only convey their hypocrisy.

  • Thanks for ‘Days’ story

    To the editor:
    I just want to thank Meaghan Downs for doing this great human interest story.  
    Having been around these ladies during good life events and sad life events,  
    I am always impressed and inspired by their strength and spirit.
    I also would like to publicly thank Elizabeth Roberts for the photos and personalizing the message on each one. She is a talented young actor and an even better person. Learn more at http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0731068/

  • Reader lived civil rights history described in Black History columns

    To the editor:
    A great big thanks to guest columnist Rick Shannon for well-written articles in commemoration of Black History Month.
    To some it was perhaps informative, and to others they were reminders of an unpleasant past. As a native southern Mississippian, I fit in the latter, because I remember where I was when each of the incidents occurred.
    Your first article dealt with the death of Emmett Till. As an 11-year-old, I remember the expression on my parents’ face as the news of Emmett’s death made its way throughout the community.