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Today's Opinions

  • Plan now for this summer’s garden

    My first column submission to the News this week was two words, “Told ya.”

    Knowing my readers as I do, I decided to dig a little deeper. I’d like to blame this wintery mess on all those who wished for a big one, but I can’t. Mother Nature took a look and said, “Well, they’ve had it easy, so I think I’ll give them a wake up call and play with the jet stream.” On the bright side, it will definitely kill all the bad bugs. I just hope the bees make it through it.

  • Fly problems in the winter? You bet

    Cluster fly is a collective name given to several species that spend winter as adults in sheltered places, including inside homes and structures.

    They tend to accumulate in wall voids, attics, and rooms with southern or western exposures. One or more species in this group may be present.

    While cluster flies are an annoyance, they do not breed indoors, and they do not cause any damage. The flies will become active on warm days, crawling and flying to windows in an attempt to escape outside.

    Cluster fly species

  • Helpful advice for parents trying to deal with teenage children

    A positive relationship with your teen will help you both make adjustments to this changing and trying time of life.

    Teens are supposed to grow in independence and decision making. Sometimes it’s very challenging for parents and teens to make these changes successfully. For every rebellious, patience trying teen, there is also probably another one who just doesn’t make many moves on her own.

    One is not necessarily better than the other.

  • Skunks, potting soil right on time

    I sure have been enjoying these later nights. I kind of like driving home from work when the sun is still up. Driving at dusk is what I call “deer-thirty,” and I have 16 miles of it. Of course, there are other wildlife showing themselves in droves this time of year, but one is especially distinctive.

  • Answers to commonly asked questions about vehicle taxes

    By Jason Denny, Anderson County Clerk

    Following are answers to questions frequently asked at the county clerk’s office.

    What does junking a vehicle really mean?

    Junking a vehicle can mean different things to different individuals. Some associate it to mean taking their vehicle to the salvage yard to have it crushed.

    Even though a vehicle is taken to the salvage yard, that alone doesn’t take the ownership or the tax implications away.

  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

    A reminder of why we love to come home

    To the editor:

    There is something to be said about a small town. No one-way streets or honking cars at red lights. Old Main Street buildings collecting the town’s history revealing their secrets in the layers of paint and traces of old business signs faded on the sides of the building.

    Yes, there is something to be said about a small town where the store owners know not only their customers but their parents, children and grandchildren.

  • Tax charts interesting, sad look at Anderson County

    Column as I see ’em …

    The old adage that figures lie and liars figure is usually true, but the two lists I’ve included here certainly don’t.

    They do, however, require a bit of explanation for those just joining us in following who is taxing us locally and who is paying the most.

    The Top 10 list is equal parts intriguing and sad, frankly, and hasn’t changed in any measurable way since the last time I printed it a couple of years ago.

  • Cold weather can be ‘lousey’ weather for livestock

    Cold weather is louse weather. Inadequate nutrition, compromised immune response and shipping stress also favor outbreaks, if there are any infested animals in the herd. Additionally, fewer daylight hours during winter appear to contribute to problems with lice.

    Spread and potential problems

    Biting and sucking lice have been associated with reduced weight gains and general lack of thriftiness during periods of greatest winter stress. These small external parasites can spread quickly through a herd as animals bunch for warmth or when feeding.