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Today's Opinions

  • Raised garden beds equal less work

    Full time work off the farm leads to busy time on the farm. Thank goodness I love what I do, in both places. It also leads to some really long days and one very tired farmer. I usually write this on Friday mornings, and after such a week of wonderfully perfect working weather, I’m a little tuckered, and perhaps just a little slap happy, so be prepared.

  • Project Graduation a worthwhile cause

    To the editor:

    First and foremost, we would like to extend our heartfelt thanks to each business, individual or group that has eagerly contributed to the 2015 Project Graduation Event.

    If you have contributed in the past and have not been contacted this year for a contribution, we apologize and would like to take this opportunity to appeal to our community to help with the costs associated with this event.

    Project Graduation is funded entirely by donations and is coordinated by a group of parents of the 2015 graduating class.

  • EMTs, paramedics deserve praise

    To the editor:

    I want to call attention to the members of Anderson County Emergency Medical Services who, day in and out, are available to answer the call to help aid and assist the citizens of this county in their times of acute injury, illness or any crisis.

    They are trained to meet any and all medical emergencies and to transport the injured, ill and those in need to hospitals for life-saving care.

  • Gritton filling in large recycling hole

    By Ben Carlson

    Column as I see ’em …

    When you’ve dug yourself a hole, stop digging.

    That old axiom is undoubtedly one that Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton heard during his years in private business, and one he certainly has put into action in regard to the county’s unsustainable recycling program.

    Gritton vowed several months ago to reign in what he estimates are losses totaling $175,000 a year in the ill-conceived recycling program that has cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars.

  • Spring brings on sensory overload

    I am loving life. Outside at 6:30 a.m. to water and still outside watching the sun go down at 8:30 p.m. It’s almost an overload of the senses. On the porch chilling at 9 p.m., only to look up and see the clear night and stars bright, while the honey locust tree blossoms perfume the air and birds singing “night, night” songs. My definition of heaven on earth.

  • Knowing teen relationships

    It’s graduation time. Most parents begin talking about success in school at an early age. How many parents actively talk about success in relationships?

    We hope our children are learning from us about how they can have healthy relationships. Maybe we need to share more about love, romance and relationship strengths.

  • Learn to manage vegetable soil insects

    There are several serious soil insect pests that we manage periodically in vegetable production, including wireworms, white grubs and seedcorn maggot.  Unfortunately, when symptoms of damage by these pests become apparent, there are no rescue treatments. Our management strategies are preventative, not reactionary. Two important factors that, in part, impact the risk of soil insect problems are rotation and field history.  The most challenging rotation for soil pests is one following established sod where wireworms and white grubs can be common.

  • Parking lot fracas not true representative of congregation

    Last week’s edition of The Anderson News carried a front page article about a fracas of some sort on the parking lot of First Baptist Church.

    The altercation occurred in connection with a basketball game held in the church’s gym. It was a very unfortunate event. News though it may be, I agree with the church’s pastor who questioned whether the story deserved front-page coverage, though I realize my judgment is that of a fellow pastor not a newsman.