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Today's Opinions

  • Tomato spotted wilt virus can damage other crops, too

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has caused more problems than usual this year, particularly in high tunnel tomato. This disease can affect tomato, pepper, potato, eggplant, lettuce, beans and cucumber along with more than 170 other plant species. TSWV may occur in the field, greenhouse, or high tunnel. Prevention, early identification, and management will help reduce plant and yield losses.

    Here are the symptoms to look for, preventative tactics, and brief suggestions on how to reduce incidence in crops once disease is confirmed.

  • Tasty quinoa kale muffins for breakfast, lunch or dinner

    There is no better feeling in the world then enjoying the benefits of truly hard work.

    The gratification of walking into my garden in July and seeing all the potential for healthy, fresh eating.

    The smell of tomatoes on the vine, the cucumbers waiting to be picked, the kale bursting upward and the beans and peas crisp and plentiful.

    I tried two new plants this year; Ichiban eggplant and edamame. I’ve already eaten the eggplant, it’s long and thin and delicious.

  • Check under your own hood first, governor

    Column as I see ’em …

    Like most of you who follow politics, I’ve taken notice during the past month or so of Gov. Bevin’s bare-knuckle brawl with a couple of TV stations and the daily papers in Lexington and Louisville, questioning their biases against him.

  • Keep your hay from going up in smoke

    You can prevent hay bale or barn fires if you bale hay at appropriate moistures and monitor the temperature of recently baled hay.

    Generally, hay will go through a heating phase within one to two weeks after baling. During this time, you should monitor the hay to make sure it doesn’t reach temperatures that can damage the hay or lead to spontaneous combustion.

  • Good wine, leftover BBQ chicken and a sweet treat

    I hope everyone had a safe and happy Fourth of July.

    I live out in the county, and although I love it, I wish the new firework ordinance applied out here.

    One of the things that make people move so far from town is peace and quiet. Not at this time of year. I must say it has been a little better this year. My dog would disagree.

    Not wanting to be a party pooper, I’ve got some great summer salad and drink ideas this week. Also, a great way to use leftover BBQ chicken.

  • Trump, McConnell, Paul, Barr owed thanks for efforts on coal

    To the editor:

    For the Kentucky Coal Association, the election of President Donald Trump gave us hope. Instead of vilifying coal like President Barack Obama did, the Trump administration recognizes that coal is a reliable and affordable source of energy.

  • Host of new laws take effect June 29

    Summer has arrived and the 2017 regular aession has become a distant memory, remaining, for the most part, only in yellowed newspaper clippings and history books.

    However, a new notation concerning the last session was made June 29 as the new and amended statutes went into effect. Unless a bill was declared an emergency or contained a special effective date, it became law on June 29.

  • Fertilize well after heavy rains

    Mother Nature is never boring. Recent rains brought a total of 4.2 inches to the farm, along with beach balls, tarps and building materials, via the creek.

    They took away about 30 tomato plants, half the beans and all the squash. Well, technically the flooding that resulted from the rains took them, along with two new hoses.