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Today's Opinions

  • Carter dealing in alternative facts

    In her column last week, Teri Carter claimed to provide facts about former president Obama’s eight years in office.

    Instead, she provides mostly just her opinion, along with alternative facts. mostly opinion and/or alternative facts.

    Here are the real facts.

    The Dow

    The Dow was at 7,949 at the end of day on Obama’s inauguration. It closed at 19,804 on his last full day in office. That is not tripled.

    Auto bailout

  • Mailbag, Facebook loaded with feedback

    Column as I see ’em ...

    Let’s start this week with a peek into the editor’s mailbag.

    A short but remarkably acerbic letter arrived last week from someone who either has very slow mail service or needs an incredible amount of time to come up with what I’m sure he/she thought were pithy insults designed to make me feel bad.

    To speak in the vernacular of my 16-year-old, it was an “epic fail.”

  • Facts show eight years under Obama anything but suffering

    The sentence I’ve heard repeated most since President Trump’s election is this: “We suffered eight years under Barack Obama.” 

    Fair enough. Let’s take a look.

    The day Obama took office, the Dow closed at 7,949 points. Eight years later, the Dow had almost tripled, closing at 21,414.

  • Don’t let wet weather ruin garden

    I believe this is the rainiest summer we’ve had in a while. I do appreciate Mother Nature doing my watering, but it sure slows me down on farm work.

    I’ve resigned myself to the fact that the place will not ever look kept until I retire. My off-the-farm work just keeps me away too many hours for it to look groomed.

  • Tomato spotted wilt virus can damage other crops, too

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has caused more problems than usual this year, particularly in high tunnel tomato. This disease can affect tomato, pepper, potato, eggplant, lettuce, beans and cucumber along with more than 170 other plant species. TSWV may occur in the field, greenhouse, or high tunnel. Prevention, early identification, and management will help reduce plant and yield losses.

    Here are the symptoms to look for, preventative tactics, and brief suggestions on how to reduce incidence in crops once disease is confirmed.

  • Tasty quinoa kale muffins for breakfast, lunch or dinner

    There is no better feeling in the world then enjoying the benefits of truly hard work.

    The gratification of walking into my garden in July and seeing all the potential for healthy, fresh eating.

    The smell of tomatoes on the vine, the cucumbers waiting to be picked, the kale bursting upward and the beans and peas crisp and plentiful.

    I tried two new plants this year; Ichiban eggplant and edamame. I’ve already eaten the eggplant, it’s long and thin and delicious.

  • Check under your own hood first, governor

    Column as I see ’em …

    Like most of you who follow politics, I’ve taken notice during the past month or so of Gov. Bevin’s bare-knuckle brawl with a couple of TV stations and the daily papers in Lexington and Louisville, questioning their biases against him.

  • Keep your hay from going up in smoke

    You can prevent hay bale or barn fires if you bale hay at appropriate moistures and monitor the temperature of recently baled hay.

    Generally, hay will go through a heating phase within one to two weeks after baling. During this time, you should monitor the hay to make sure it doesn’t reach temperatures that can damage the hay or lead to spontaneous combustion.