.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Swallowed by education’s complicated alphabet soup

    My favorite writers — journalists, poets and songwriters alike — tell it like it is.
    No careful waltzes around the truth.
    No ring-around-the-rosy games around what really matters.
    Which is why the convoluted language of education, especially the dizzyingly complicated formulas of Kentucky’s new educational assessment standards, is particularly frustrating.
    The main and justified criticism of No Child Left Behind legislation was that its standards for school improvement were unrealistic and complicated.

  • Joys of fatherhood know no boundaries

    While hiding in the hallway, I listened as the commander retold the story I told him a few hours earlier.
    It was the story of how my daughter, Hayley, had gone from aspiring college student bent on becoming a physical therapist to landing in that career field with the Air Force. The catch, though, required her to report to boot camp three days later, leaving her parents almost no time to come to grips with the fact that their middle child was leaving the nest.
    The commander knew I was listening in the hallway. Hayley didn’t have a clue.

  • Fried fish, without the greasy feel or taste

    Fish is healthy but fried fish is not as good for us as fish that’s prepared without frying.
    In fact, nutritionists say that frying fish negates the benefit of eating fish.  
    I like a crunchy coating on the fish but I don’t like a greasy feel or taste. The best way to get crunch is to use panko bread crumbs. Corn flakes will work, but they still look like crunched corn flakes to me.
    Regular bread crumbs are softer and don’t get as crunchy.

  • Now’s the time to start planting tomato seeds

    There are only five more Mondays until spring.
    I have to say that I have loved this winter. I haven’t had to walk up the drive even once.
    Last winter I walked for almost a month. Sure, it got me in shape and offered plenty of beautiful night skies, but slipping and sliding while carrying groceries or dog food, was not my idea of a good time.
    We should be done with the snow, if the August fog predictor is accurate. The number of foggy mornings predicted the number of snows accurately last year, so I’m hopeful.

  • Coke and Red Bull? Not with my money

    Column as I see ’em …
    I was already in a sour mood when I stopped to fill my gas tank Friday night.
    I had just reviewed my year-end tax documents and was doing a slow burn over how much money was confiscated from my family so it could be squandered by politicians bottom fishing for votes.
    My burn grew a little hotter as the meter on the gas pump charged toward $60, so I shut it off and figured a chat with the jovial cashier inside might put me in a better mood before I went home.

  • Daughter thankful for article on mother

    To the editor:
    Thank you for choosing to write the facts of our precious mother’s body being [allegedly] damaged by the staff of Sunset Memorial Gardens.
    That body belonged to Katherine Galbraith, a woman who had lived through the Depression, World War II, the death of her child and the suicide of her husband.
    She was much loved by her daughters, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, niece and countless others she adopted along the way of her life.

  • For the love of country life

    Last Saturday morning, I spent three hours watching two men trap for beavers off the banks of the Kentucky River.
    Never thought I’d write that sentence.
    I also never imagined that I’d eat barbecued squirrel. Or taste test burgoo. Or finally learn how not to panic while driving on narrow country roads in western Anderson County.
    I may be a day late in celebrating Valentine’s Day, but I figured it’s never too late to confess a secret love: my unabashed admiration for country life.  

  • Bustin, Cornish, Lee, Hoskins, Smallwood owe apology tonight

    We’ll hear plenty when the Anderson County Health Board meets tonight (Wednesday) at 6.
    We’ll hear which health department employee has lost his or her job.
    We’ll hear which employees will be reduced to part time.
    We’ll hear how many furlough days employees will be forced to endure.
    But if history is any indicator, what we won’t hear is an apology from those responsible for inflicting this hardship on these employees and their families.