Today's Opinions

  • Gardening bug ready to bite

    March might be cold, wet and snowy, but I still believe we have come out ahead this winter.
    I joked to someone the other day that this is the kind of winters I expected to have when I moved here 16 years ago.
    This is the time of year when I really hit the pantry. I tend to scrimp on using up my home canned stuff in fall and winter, fearing I’ll run out before the fresh stuff is harvested. Now, I can eat all I want of the stuff.

  • Christians share similarities to other cults

    To the editor:
    I enjoyed Ms. Kennedy’s Feb. 15 column titled “Seeking God’s face without a formula.”
    Over the years I have encountered the story of “cargo cults” many times while studying World War II history. 
    I find the phenomena interesting and a fine example of writer, inventor and futurist, Arthur C. Clarke’s third law of prediction which states: any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

  • Senate bill good start, but more is needed

    Column as I see ’em …
    It’s good to see I’m not alone in yammering for taxing districts to be made more accountable.
    The state senate agrees, at least when it comes to libraries.
    During the recent session, the senate passed a bill that would give judge-executives and their fiscal courts the power to appoint those they consider best suited to serve as library trustees.

  • Support the children of military personnel April 28

    Anderson County residents include at least 70 children who are military dependents from all branches of the military.
    Frequent deployments have become a way of life in the past 10 years. Returning home is not necessarily easy for the families or military personnel.
    Community members can help military families by understanding that no one reacts the same to coming home. Rejoice together at reunions and give families time and space to re-integrate.

  • Nothing normal about this winter season

    Mark your calendars. The Heirloom Seed Workshop will be held at 10 a.m. on March 24 at the public library’s large meeting room.
    Pre-registration is required (to make sure everyone gets a chair). You can call the library at 839-6420 or stop in to register. It is a free workshop.

  • Swallowed by education’s complicated alphabet soup

    My favorite writers — journalists, poets and songwriters alike — tell it like it is.
    No careful waltzes around the truth.
    No ring-around-the-rosy games around what really matters.
    Which is why the convoluted language of education, especially the dizzyingly complicated formulas of Kentucky’s new educational assessment standards, is particularly frustrating.
    The main and justified criticism of No Child Left Behind legislation was that its standards for school improvement were unrealistic and complicated.

  • Joys of fatherhood know no boundaries

    While hiding in the hallway, I listened as the commander retold the story I told him a few hours earlier.
    It was the story of how my daughter, Hayley, had gone from aspiring college student bent on becoming a physical therapist to landing in that career field with the Air Force. The catch, though, required her to report to boot camp three days later, leaving her parents almost no time to come to grips with the fact that their middle child was leaving the nest.
    The commander knew I was listening in the hallway. Hayley didn’t have a clue.

  • Fried fish, without the greasy feel or taste

    Fish is healthy but fried fish is not as good for us as fish that’s prepared without frying.
    In fact, nutritionists say that frying fish negates the benefit of eating fish.  
    I like a crunchy coating on the fish but I don’t like a greasy feel or taste. The best way to get crunch is to use panko bread crumbs. Corn flakes will work, but they still look like crunched corn flakes to me.
    Regular bread crumbs are softer and don’t get as crunchy.