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Today's Opinions

  • Failing grade for Kentucky Utilities

    We’ll give credit to Kentucky Utilities for owning up to the problem with its contracted meter reader (see A1), but the credit stops there.
    At a minimum, the thousands of people affected by this ridiculous foul-up should have received some sort of warning from the company, along with a letter in their September bills that spelled out their payment options.
    What they received, though, were incredibly high electric bills with no explanation of why they went up so much, or what customers could do about it.

  • Worried about having gaseous tomatoes? Wrap ’em up

    Is anyone else surprised that fall is almost here?
    Here on the farm, there are many indicators of the changing of the seasons, but two stand out: football and furball frenzy.
    I know most look at the falling leaves and temperatures as signs the season is changing. Not here.
    I’ve already printed out my Steelers schedule for Sunday afternoon games, and Spanky and Tiller have begun their daily farm tours.

  • Harry Wise residents won’t take zoning change lightly

    To the editor:
    As residents of Anderson County, we have come to accept the good old boy politics we witness all too often.
    That said, when the shenanigans are so blatant that one can’t avoid the smell of impropriety, even the easiest going ones of us cannot sit idly by.
    Here are the facts at hand: A resident and business owner of Anderson County who lives on Harry Wise Road has decided to subdivide his property to the tune of 17 lots.

  • Guest columnist Thompson needs a history lesson

    To the editor:
    Richard Dawkins, a well-known atheist, is purported to have commented that one should not argue with a Christian.
    That may be so. However, in Jess Thompson’s guest column titled “Atheist spreading message of nothing,” in the Aug. 31 edition of The Anderson News, I find a few minor details that may be misleading.

  • Home school mom eager to hear why kids can’t play public school sports

    To the editor:
    Thank you so much for writing your opinion [in last week’s paper] on why home-schooled children shouldn’t be allowed to play sports.
    As a mother of three athletic boys that I school at home, I can tell you that this issue is discussed often at my house.
    I too have very often wondered who is being hurt by allowing my children, who live in the district, to continue with home schooling and still be able to participate in public school sports.

  • Coaches missing out on home-schooled talent

    To the editor:
    It was with much delight that I read your column last week concerning home-schooled children and public school sports.
    I was a four-year resident of Anderson County and my three oldest children were in the public school system during these years.
    Let me go on and state from the beginning that each of my children had a positive experience within Anderson County schools.
    Recently, my family went through several big changes, including a move to Mercer County (in July) and the big one — my children are now schooled at home.

  • Home-schoolers hit government schools where it hurts most: the wallet

    To the editor:
    I would like to thank Editor Ben Carlson for his latest column in The Anderson News and for giving a platform to address his question, “What will it hurt to have home-schooled students play sports in public schools.”
    Truly, what will it hurt?
    I could sit here and argue each point that Mr. Carlson outlined in his column, however, I truly believe the bottom line is what this hurts is the pocketbook and ego of our lawmakers.

  • Carlson’s take on home-schoolers playing public sports just wrong

    Ben Carlson is my boss, but when it comes to whether home-schooled children should be allowed to play sports on school teams, he’s just wrong.
    A week ago, Carlson penned a column asking what would it hurt if children whose parents have opted to educate their children at home instead of in a public or private school were allowed to play interscholastic sports.