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Today's Opinions

  • Hoarding is more than sad TV show

    Compulsive hoarding is a health condition that has received much attention from the media in recent years. However, hoarding is not always easy to detect and may be more widespread than many believe.
    Compulsive hoarding can be secretive. An individual can discreetly accumulate items over many years. Sometimes hoarding is discovered only when the individual is no longer able to live in their own home or the family cleans the home following the loved one’s death.

  • Remedies to keep your vehicle free of ice

    Well we’ve made it to the season of “ahh.” The holidays are over and we start to settle back in to some kind of routine. Our days and nights are calmer. The decorations are back in their boxes and all the trash has finally been picked up. Now, we just have to get through winter.  

  • Christmas meal a success

    To the editor:
    We would like to thank everyone who prepared and donated food, their time and prayers to make Christmas Day at Open Hands Pantry a huge success and blessing.
    It is because of Walmart’s donations, Kroger and all the churches and people who were involved — too many to mention for the fear of leaving someone out we were able to feed 440 meals on that day.
    If you have never been involved in this ministry on Christmas Day we suggest you take time out give it a try; we guarantee you will leave there blessed or maybe a different person.

  • Obama, others set bad example

    To the editor:
    The tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School brought out the usual hypocrisy on Capitol Hill and in the White House.
    Politicians pointed fingers at everybody and everything but the contribution their bad examples make to such tragedies.
    During their so-called “fiscal cliff” showdown, the juvenile conduct displayed by President Obama, other Democrats and the Republicans was not over a solution. Their childlike haggle was over a tiny fraction of the needed solution.

  • State of children poor, in numbers

    Numbers can wound or heal depending on how you wield them.
    One of the side effects of working as a reporter includes thousands numbers tangling themselves into piles of paper stored into file folders in what I consider to be the organized chaos of my desk: salary figures, test score percentiles, ages, birthdays, funeral services, election returns and meeting dates, to name a few.
    Numbers have always been important when it comes to reporting news.
    The greater the number, the bigger the story.   

  • Chandler’s final vote comes as no surprise

    Column as I see ’em …
    Ben Chandler must have gone to bed the evening of Nov. 6 wondering what in the world went wrong after losing so badly in his effort to remain in Congress.
    Fast forward to his Jan. 2 fiscal cliff vote to increase the deficit by $4 trillion and it’s safe to say he still hasn’t figured it out.

  • Treasury is place to look for owed money

    With holiday bills mounting, many of us wish we could find money we lost, forgot about or didn’t know we had. Finding lost valuables, such as insurance policies and unclaimed money or property, is easier than you might think.

  • Question the logic of so-called fiscal cliff

    Americans are told that they face a “fiscal cliff” if automatic federal spending cuts and tax increases occur at the end of 2012. I’m not in favor of jumping off a cliff, but the logic of the supposed threat needs to be questioned.
    The fiscal-cliff narrative assumes that spending cuts are bad for the economy. It follows, then, that more spending (and therefore more government debt) are good for the economy.