Today's Opinions

  • Fall’s racing toward finish line in a hurry

    Haven’t the sunsets been magnificent?
    As the sun gets lower in the sky and the wind blows particles into the air, the colors of Earth’s spin out take on a rosy glow. At least it’s a great climax to our ever shorter days.
    By next week we’ll have just over 10 hours of daylight each day. Those precious hours begin to dwindle quickly as we move closer to the winter solstice. All the more reason to hurry up and get those outside chores done.

  • Burgoo cook-off great for Shop With a Cop

    To the editor:
    The recent Burgoo Festival featured the first ever Burgoo Cook-off, with all proceeds going to the Anderson County Shop With a Cop Program.
    When it was over, $460 had been raised for this amazing program.
    I feel some thanks are very much in order.
    First and foremost I’d like to thank Editor Ben Carlson, who came up with the idea and marched on with it in the face of numerous naysayers who proclaimed that it would not amount to anything.

  • Finally, a president who supports coal

    To the editor:
    The recent news that the Big Sandy Power Plant near Louisa will continue to operate as a coal-burning electrical generation plant should be a cause for celebration throughout its distribution area.
    I applaud Kentucky Power Company President Greg Pauley’s decision to keep it coal. It’s good to see a president that appreciates coal. From day one, President Obama has been against coal. He has allowed the EPA to promulgate its own rules that have sent miners home due to the stalling-out effect of their rules on the industry.

  • Spared rod to blame for Healing Field thefts

    To the editor:
    Regarding the article two weeks about about the theft of flags from the Healing Field, Auxiliary member Pam Rice said the thefts were “very disturbing.”
    Congressman Ben Chandler said he can’t understand why anyone would resort to stealing flags.
    Attorney Marie Hellard agreed, saying she also can’t understand the thefts.
    What concerns me more than the thefts is that you all don’t get it, and some of you are in positions of power.

  • A chance to meet living history

    Ella Belle Overstreet Baxter graciously welcomed me into her home.
    But what she didn’t know what was that I wanted her secret to long life.
    Saving that, her portal to the past.
    Ella has watched Anderson County evolve for about 100 years.
    She’s been alive for both World Wars, minor and major military conflicts abroad.
    She watched distilleries flourish, then wilt; lacking liquid courage they needed during the years of Prohibition.
    The clicks of Morse Code transformed into the pings of incoming text messages.

  • Censorship a slippery slope for health board

    Column as I see ’em …
    Shut up.
    Those two words together can be rather offensive, can’t they? They become even more so when those in authority decide not only if we’re allowed to speak, but limit what we’re allowed to even say.

  • Lousy winter prediction means time to prepare

    I love nature. The beautiful sounds of the morning birds serenading me, joined by the magnificent sight of fall leaves bordering the bright green hay fields, makes me stop in my tracks every time. Then, I remember that winter is coming.

  • Trick-or-treat hours should be set to later time

    To the editor:
    The celebration of Halloween climaxes with the trick-or-treaters going door to door throughout our neighborhoods.
    Typically, this is done at sundown as it used to be done in Lawrenceburg.
    For the past two years the time has been move to an earlier time in the evening.
    This has taken some of the fun and spookiness out of the experience for everyone.
    As very large supporters of Halloween, we decorate every year for this fun and spooky event.