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Today's Opinions

  • Break out the hose and watch your garden grow

    Summer is official here and that means the real fun is about to begin.
    Cabbage, potatoes, and squash should be gracing dinner tables everywhere, and beans, corn, cucumbers and tomatoes aren’t far behind.
    While I love my winter casseroles, summer food is my favorite.

  • Rebates are out there, you just have to try

    In April I mailed in a rebate request for a garden hose I had purchased locally.
    I received a postcard stating that I had forgotten to send in the receipt and had a couple of weeks to return it with the postcard attached. I was lucky to find the receipt quickly. It cost two stamps and less than 10 minutes altogether to get the $10 rebate.  
    Did you know that many rebates go unclaimed?  Consumers don’t complete the forms either on-line or through the mail. Others throw away the box with the bar code on it.

  • Volunteer enjoys volunteering here

    To the editor:
    I spent the past week working with the Kentucky Changers in Lawrenceburg and at Open Hands Food Pantry.
    I have never worked before, giving food to the needy. It truly blessed my heart.
    I had the privilege of praying with 60-plus families and passing out prayer rocks.
    Please, Anderson County, donate food and money to the  panty. Director David Montgomery is doing an awesome job, but he needs your help because he can’t do it alone.

  • Pre-integration memories linger for black Anderson County student

    My story is about where I went to high school. To visit this, we have to go back to 1951, my first year in high school.
    It was September 1951 when the black high school students who lived in the city limits of Lawrenceburg were put on a school bus and transported to Lincoln Institute High School, located in Lincoln Ridge, about two miles from Simpsonville.
    Lincoln opened its doors in 1912; we have just finished 100 years. All black people who got out of high school before 1962 finished at Lincoln Institute, and the Lock Road kids went to Simmons in Versailles.

  • No more ‘yes’ men, woman for library

    To the editor:
    I read your column in last week’s paper about the way our property taxes are divided and think most of us can agree that while the library is very useful and we all love it, the expense is outrageous.
    This is a classic case of abuse of our tax money. I recently went to a library board meeting and it took me about five minutes to identify the problem. It’s the board.
    These folks are doing the best they can, but there are no accountants, bankers business owners, etc., on it.
    The library tells them what she wants and gets it.

  • Where sidewalk ends, city’s responsibility begins

    Look closely at where the sidewalk ends.
    If you’re like me, you usually don’t think about the short drop where the concrete curb’s lip meets the street.
    For Anderson County residents like Lovada Melser, sometimes you’re forced to think of nothing else.
    Melser, who lives in one of the Breckenridge Estates apartments off of US 62, describes herself as an independent woman.
    It bothers her to have to ask people for help, she said.

  • Meet Lawrenceburg’s Hatfields and McCoys

    Have you seen latest television series about the Hatfields and McCoys?
    If not, don’t bother searching it out in reruns because a battle here between city and county government is remarkably entertaining — even without all the bloodshed.
    For our purposes, we’ll make the fiscal court the County Hatfields and the city council the City McCoys. (You’ll find out why shortly.)
    Like the famous families, the County Hatfields and City McCoys have been locked in battle for years, and no one is absolutely certain exactly what caused the ruckus.

  • Military kids and pizza ingredients a good mix

    Last weekend I volunteered at the Operation Military Kids Family Camp.
    All of the families had the common bond of recent deployment.
    The families were able to relax and enjoy being a family. Lodging and meals were provided and fun activities were planned to help families celebrate togetherness.
    There were a lot of young children and about 10 teens along with the parents.
    The Department of Defense sponsors grants for these camps because evidence shows that strong families support service personnel.