.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • There’s votes on ‘them there’ roads

    By Ben Carlson, Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    If you want to start a dust-up with members of the Anderson County Fiscal Court, just get them debating how to spend road funds.

    We were nearly privy to such an event last Tuesday when Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton called for booting 3rd District Magistrate Juretta Wells out of the process of picking a road for the county’s priority road list, which I’m not sure is even legal.

  • Watch for Full Strawberry Moon

    Watching the sky at night is way more interesting than watching TV.

    Of course, living in the country gives me much better reception folks can get in town. There is very little light pollution when you live out in the boonies. A clear sky at night is not just an indicator of fair weather. It’s an opportunity to appreciate beauty and science all at once.

  • Warmer weather means tick season is here

    Ticks can make outdoor activities very uncomfortable in Kentucky, as well as posing a potential public health threat. Tick season extends from mid-March through August.

    Lone Star Ticks

  • Avoid home selling turnoffs

    If you’re buying a house, you probably know what turns you off in homes that you tour: messy, cluttered houses, strong odors, color schemes that are unique and so on. Most people can’t wait to get out of a house like that. When you are selling your house, be sure to prepare. Avoid these major turnoffs and you go a long way toward making your home a place visitors won’t be in such a hurry to leave.

    Pets

  • Outdoor cats susceptible to strokes, too

    By Jane Sinnett, Guest Columnist

    You don’t think of it happening to that sweet, soft, bundle of fur that literally vibrates with contentment while lying in your lap as you stroke the silky fur.

    But happen it does. Adult cats of both genders and any breed can suffer from strokes. It has been found most feline strokes are diagnosed during the summer months in outdoor cats living in the northeastern United States or in southeastern Canada.

  • Confederate, Union monuments should be honored

    To the editor:

    I was raised in Fayette and Woodford counties. Most courthouse lawns and courthouse squares have Confederate or Union monuments.

    Confederates were mainly men from all around Kentucky, mostly farmers and not slave owners.

    Less than 10 percent in the Bluegrass owned slaves and were wealthy planters. There we black Confederates as well that served, and in all fairness we need to honor these beautiful monuments all around the commonwealth, Confederate and Union.

  • Farmers suffering from wet weather woes

    The good news is that it’s actually healthier to let your grass grow long this time of year. Experts say 3 inches is a good height. They don’t say anything about 6-12 inches. Oh, these rains.

    Typically in July, our average monthly rainfall is 4 inches. Guess it just wanted to be an overachiever this year. At least we don’t have to water the trees and shrubs to help them handle these hot July temperatures. Geez-o-pete. It’s like Mother Nature took a water pill and has to pee every 20 minutes.

  • Feeding hay? Know the facts about blister beetles

    Blister beetles are plant-feeding insects that contain cantharidin, a toxic defensive chemical that protects them from predators.

    Accidentally crushing a beetle against the skin can result in a painful blister, the source of the insect’s common name. In sufficient quantity, cantharidin in the bodies of living or dead blister beetles can be toxic, especially to horses. In some cases sheep and cattle may be affected.

    Blister beetle poisoning