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Today's Opinions

  • How to prevent soft-bodied slugs from ruining your plants this spring

    Slugs are among the first creatures to become active in spring. They scrape their mouthparts across leaves, stems and flowers to ingest plant tissue. Shade gardens are ideal habitats for slugs, along with mulched areas containing bedding plants. New transplants and small seedlings are especially vulnerable to these creatures. Feeding damage and silvery slime trails are already apparent on bedding plants.

  • Time to get spring veggies in the ground

    Talk about some gorgeous days! The longer light and warm temperatures sure have made for some productive days on the farm. I’ve noticed several newly plowed garden plots around the county, so I know I’m not alone in ratcheting up our outdoor activity level.

    While I was out playing, I noticed numerous times when a teeny, tiny little tick was crawling on my hands. These things are smaller than a pin head and they can crawl into lots of places. You don’t even feel them crawling on you because they are so light.

  • A wall of Trump’s own making

    I’ve hit a wall of my own making.

    I started jogging before Christmas, and though I could not complete even 1 mile without walking some, I decided to sign up for my first half marathon on April 1.

    With zero experience running long distances and not bothering to research training regimens, I figured three months would be plenty of time to get to 13 miles. I would work hard. I was committed. Piece of proverbial cake.

  • Live in Taylorsville? I don’t think so

    Taylorsville is a neat little community, but I sure wouldn’t want to live there.

    Here’s why: A front page story in last week’s edition of The Spencer Magnet chronicled how a teenager housesitting for friends cowered in a bathroom after hearing someone breaking into the house. The teen called 911 but, because law enforcement in Spencer County is a full-blown Dumpster fire these days, the first officers to arrive were troopers who traveled there from Anderson County.

  • Throwing some shade on safety report

    Column as I see ’em …

    While admittedly running the risk of sounding like President Trump poo-pooing intelligence reports from the nation’s spooks, I nevertheless have to throw some shade on the Transportation Cabinet’s safety study on Highway 151.

  • Let the gardening season begin

    It’s spring, so let’s indulge in all things green.

    We can begin with a green thumb. Those who believe they lack said thumb need only do two things. The first is put the plant in light, where you will see it a lot, every day. The second is to water it when the soil is no longer damp. Try it.

    There is a lot of green sprouting up in the yard. I have patches of deep green and spots of yellow green. The yellow green tells me the acid is high in the soil there, so it is a good spot for some acid-loving plants, or a healthy dose of agricultural lime.

  • Charter schools among legislation designed to improve education

    Each of us had a school teacher who we still remember today. That teacher may have spent extra time helping us hone a skill we needed a little more time to learn. Or maybe he or she was a listening ear when we couldn’t find one anywhere else.

  • Here are keys to manage frost damage in your alfalfa stands

    First, it is important to understand that determining the temperature that alfalfa stands were exposed to during a frost event is less than exact science.

    Air temperature reported by local news stations likely uses data logged at a weather station that was installed according to National Weather Service guidelines. These guidelines state that sensors should be installed on level terrain, away from paved or concrete surfaces and upright structures, 4 to 6 feet above the soil surface, and in a radiation shield.