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Today's Opinions

  • Managing the Asian tiger mosquito is important, particularly now

    The Asian tiger mosquito is a serious nuisance at best and a potential public health threat at worst.

    This aggressive day-biting mosquito prefers mammals, such as humans, cats, dogs, etc., but will occasionally feed on birds.

    It is capable of transmitting 30 viruses and the dog heartworm. This accidentally introduced species probably occurs throughout Kentucky.

    The ATM  (Figure 1) can carry the chikungunya virus, which has been in the news lately.

  • Prepare for fall garden planting... and try fried some pickles

    Here we are in our seventh month and if your green thumb has worked, as a gardener you should be in seventh heaven!

    The harvest season is on! Thankfully, we have more than 14 hours of daylight in which to do it.

    Those of us who plant for the pantry are beginning preparations for the fall garden now.

    Yes, I know you have planted your summer garden but it is time to plant another one if you like peas, broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage.

  • Include ‘superfood’ blueberries in your diet with this recipe

    Blueberries are delicious and healthy. They are labeled a super food because of their high antioxidant content, fiber and vitamins.

    In the last 5 years, there have been reliable studies that support the health benefits of blueberries. Citations for these studies are available at the Anderson County Extension Office.

    One finding is that blueberries can improve memory.

    After 12 weeks of daily blueberry consumption, older adults showed improvement on two different tests of cognitive function, including memory.

  • Many youth are ineligible for military service

    Two-thirds of U.S. youth are unqualified to serve in the military, according to the Pentagon.

    The top shortcomings that restrict youth for being able to serve in the military are physical, behavioral issues, no high school diploma, prescription medicine for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, tattoos and ear gauge pierces.

  • My stay was brief but this community truly won me over

    I’ve become attached to Lawrenceburg and Anderson County.

    When I arrived 4 months ago, my familiarity was based on drives to Frankfort and stopping at the now defunct food court here on KY 127.

    My cousin was married in the Kavanaugh House and still lives in Lawrenceburg to this day.

    But next week will mark my final week at the helm of The Anderson News. While my stay was brief, my leaving is still bittersweet.

    Here is the view of an outsider who got to be an insider for a brief period.

  • Darland made large corporate store all hers

    When I pulled up to Walmart Monday morning, I felt like I knew Kim Darland from all the secondhand stories passed down to me.

    Each person gave me a small piece of her.

    Mark Willard, an assistant manager at Walmart who has worked with Darland for 23 years, told me about her strong leadership.

    Darland nurtured a young cart boy who had a desire to work his way up to become more.

  • Mornings are perfect for pickin’ beans... sunsets for breakin’

    It must be the old park ranger in me but I do love a good sunset. It is such a peaceful scene, with nothing but friendly conversations between feathered friends, hopping from branch to branch.

    The hay field lays clean and green in the foreground. After the raking and baling, dried brown shoots, nourished by the sun and rain, once again give me my verdant rolling hills.

    Far beyond, cattle graze on the uplands, seen only through a break between the trees.

  • It’s Japanese Beetle season so be prepared: consider these tips

    There have been two reports of Japanese beetle sightings for 2014: late last week from Lyon County and early this week from Franklin County.

    The beetles will continue to emerge over the next 2 weeks or so, especially following a soil softening rain.

    Individual beetles live for about 5 weeks; the season usually lasts for six to eight weeks, peaking in mid-July.

    Management

    Many insecticides are labeled for use against adult Japanese beetles, if control is needed.