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Features

  • Ask both his wife and his boss and they’ll tell you — Daniel “Danny” Gaines had a heart of gold.

    “He had an outgoing personality,” said Gaines’ wife, Crystal. “He’d do anything for anybody. If he had the means to do it, he would do it.”

    Gaines, of Frankfort, died unexpectedly Nov. 23. He had an enlarged heart. Born Nov. 28, 1974, he was 33.

  • Other than finding a mall parking space on Black Friday, perhaps the second most pressing issue most Americans will have the day after Thanksgiving is what to do with all that leftover turkey.

    Everyone has fallback positions, including turkey sandwiches slathered with mayo and turkey salad. The uncouth will even grab a chunk out of the fridge, douse it with salt and slam it down.

  • Two words describe what the Anderson County High School Advanced Chorus is doing this year — “keeping busy.”

    At least that’s what Director Sue Lou Smith says of her 40-member choir.

    Ten members auditioned for the Kentucky All-State High School Chorus and six were recently selected to perform with the choir this winter.

    Those six are Alex Cheser, tenor; Ramsey Edington, alto; Jade Martin, tenor; Eric Steedly, bass; Singrid Tipton, soprano; and Katelyn York, soprano.

  • I voted eight times — I’ll explain that later — last Tuesday morning for McCain.

    Needless to say I was disappointed that evening when Obama claimed victory and McCain accepted defeat.

    Losing only matters, though, when you examine what went wrong and fix the errors of your ways.

    Here’s where I went wrong.

    I admit being a bit dubious at first about McCain, and was struggling to consider voting for him once, let alone eight times.

  • A crowd of about 30 attended the city's grand opening of its disc golf course Saturday at the city park.

    Lawrenceburg Mayor Edwinna Baker cut the ceremonial ribbon and made the first official throw at the course.

    As part of the grand opening events, the city hosted a "closest to the pin" contest. Discs were given away as prizes to the five closest throws and the five furthest away. Baker also gave discs to the oldest person, who was 50, and the youngest person, who was 15, in attendance.

  • Squeezing Linda Apple for her lemonade secret is a waste of time.

    Not that her fellow Anderson County Fire Department Auxiliary members haven't tried.

    "Oh, they've tried," she said, taking a break from serving Lemon Shake Ups during last weekend's Burgoo Festival. "They've tried everything known to man and woman to get that recipe out of me, but I'm not saying."

  • Refueling helicopters while fighting in the war in Iraq doesn't seem to faze Army Spec. Kyle Porteous.

    That was hardly the case, though, when he got his first glimpse of his infant daughter last Sunday night at the airport in Lexington.

    "I just froze," said Porteous, 21. "I couldn't believe she was actually real. I've seen pictures and talked on the phone, but when I saw her with my own eyes, it was the best feeling in the world."

    Porteous deployed for Iraq last October, leaving behind his wife of only two months, Lisa, who was pregnant with the couple's first child.

  • When "Scare Fest" opens at Lexington's Heritage Hall on Sept. 12, it will be the largest horror and paranormal convention ever held in the Southeast, according to one of the event's organizers, Jeff Waldridge, an Anderson County native.

    "In terms of space and guest list, it will be the largest," Waldridge said, who along with Patti Starr is event manager and co-creator.

    He also hopes the turnout will be large.

  • Almost three months after receiving a heart transplant that saved her life, Carla Sparrow is well on her way to a full recovery.

    Sparrow, whose ordeal was chronicled in the May 28 and June 4 editions of The Anderson News, received her new heart May 28. While complications arose after the surgery, she pushed through.

    "My kidneys shut down for four of five days, and I had to be on dialysis before they started working," Sparrow said. "Now I feel great. I can run around with Blake now. It's awesome."

  • Its peers stand as high as an elephant's eye this time of year, their silk-covered ears ready for husking.

    But not this lonely stalk of corn. It likely sprang to life accidentally when its seed fell from a passing truck and settled into a crevice on the shoulder of North Main Street.

    So far, the little fellow has defied the odds, finding just enough soil beneath the pavement and water above it to eek out a life.

  • Last weekend, Highway 127 wasn't the only place to find a yard sale.

    Several city and county residents put up their poster boards hoping to attract some of the crowd off the beaten path.

    Barbara Willard and her daughter, Melanie Wiley, set up camp at Wiley's house on Bonds Mill Road just under a mile off of 127.

    "We've found that this is usually the best time to do it," Willard said.

    In about three hours on Friday, Willard and Wiley said they had already had a lot of traffic and had customers from several different states.

  • For Stanley Baldwin, it's this simple: the Bluegrass Ultra-transit Service, or BUS, is one of the reasons he's still alive.

    This October will make four years since Baldwin, 60, learned that his kidneys had started to fail him. And this October will make four years since Baldwin started riding the BUS, sponsored by the Bluegrass Community Action Partnership, to his dialysis treatments in Frankfort.

    And Tuesday, the BUS helped make his life even better.

  • While most Americans were gathered around a tree celebrating Christmas with family and friends, a few Anderson County native sons and daughters were experiencing an entirely different type of holiday season.

    Stationed in Iraq or Afghanistan, their Christmas joy was shared with what has become their second family - their brothers and sisters-in-arms.

  • After a 10-year coast-to-coast sojourn, Lawrenceburg native son Jason Cubert is back home, law degree in hand, and has opened an office in Lawrenceburg.

    Like many youngsters, Cubert had little interest in staying in his hometown after he graduated from Anderson County High in 1992. And by the time he earned his Georgetown College degree, he was convinced that his future lay beyond the borders of Kentucky.

    So heeding Horace Greeley's famous admonition to "Go West young man," Cubert loaded up his car and headed to Portland, Oregon.

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