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Opinion

  • Column as I see ’em …

    It’s not a good year to be a non-profit agency in Anderson County, at least for those who look to the fiscal court for funding.

    For those dreaming of swimming pools and attracting tourists, it’s not nearly as bad.

    In the 2015-16 budget unanimously approved last Tuesday morning, non-profits took a significant hit to the tune of $22,000 less than they received in the budget about to expire at the end of this month.

  • By Ben Carlson

    Column as I see ’em …

    When you’ve dug yourself a hole, stop digging.

    That old axiom is undoubtedly one that Judge-Executive Orbrey Gritton heard during his years in private business, and one he certainly has put into action in regard to the county’s unsustainable recycling program.

    Gritton vowed several months ago to reign in what he estimates are losses totaling $175,000 a year in the ill-conceived recycling program that has cost taxpayers hundreds of thousands of dollars.

  • By Ben Carlson, Publisher

    America and all that she stands for was on full display last Wednesday afternoon at Emma B. Ward Elementary School.

    For a moment, we watched through tear-blurred eyes the abject joy of a young boy reunited with his father, a soldier who sacrificed a year away from his wife and children so that we, you and I, can live in relative peace and security.

  • The North Star quilt block on the barn at the Anderson County Park is a beautiful addition to the park. Two community partners assisted with block finishing and hanging.

  • Hooray it’s May. Let the beautiful planting season begin. I’m willing to bet my truck that everyone with a garden patch was out working it last weekend. I can almost hear a collective “ahh” as people dabble in the dirt planting food and flowers. Whether it’s the instant gratification we get when planting beautiful flowers or the more patience inducing seed plantings, there is just something uplifting about gardening.

  • Hopefully, the wet weather we have been experiencing will abate soon and allow vegetable growers to work their soil and move transplants to fields.

    Early-season insect problems on vegetables are very different than those later in the summer. Early season pests often impact the health and vigor of the plant rather than feeding on the portion of the plant we intend to market.

  • By Ben Carlson, Publisher/Editor

    Column as I see ’em …

    Forgive me if I sound a bit frustrated this week.

    It seems that every time opportunity knocks in Anderson County, we aren’t able to respond in the ways our neighbors can.

    I spent a good deal of time during the past week asking questions about chicken swaps, truck and tractor pulls and swimming pools, only to walk away from every conversation shaking my head.

  • By Ben Carlson

    Column as I see ’em …

    I’ve heard several rumors lately about what might be coming to the land purchased several months ago by the joint economic development authority just south of the Bluegrass Parkway. I can neither confirm nor deny any of them, but have my doubts anything will be locating there anytime soon.

    The problem is natural gas. That location doesn’t have it and getting it there will require someone to spend millions to do so.

  • Anderson County as well as surrounding counties have experienced flooding. Recovery after the flooding presents many challenges.

    Read about salvaging large appliances and carpeting and other flooring. The bad news is that frequently neither large appliances nor flooring can be saved.

    It’s hard to say whether it’s harder to clean up after a flood or a fire. I personally think it’s more of a challenge after a flood.

    Large electrical appliances

  • By now you know what Andrew Harrison supposedly said.

    If you don’t know what the University of Kentucky basketball player uttered Saturday after the Wildcats were ousted from the NCAA Tournament, you obviously haven’t been paying attention.

    In case you really did miss it, here is a little refresher.

  • By Ben Carlson, Publisher

    It doesn’t matter which side you’re on when it comes to the disappointing decision of the Kentucky Court of Appeals regarding a lawsuit filed against our library and others in Northern Kentucky.

    The bottom line is that with its decision in favor of the libraries, the Court of Appeals is allowing an unelected and wholly unaccountable body to set tax rates and spend other people’s money.

    It’s called taxation without representation and, like the old TV cartoon said, that’s not fair.

  • Column as I see ’em …

    Well, folks, it’s official. As of a week or so ago, the county government – and by extension, you – is now $400,000 deeper in debt after the fiscal court voted unanimously to borrow that much money to balance its next budget.

    If you follow along you already know the reason why: the recycling program that costs a fortune and brings in almost no revenue.

  • I will never be one complain that Anderson County Schools should be in session on a winter day when my street is clear.

    While my home is now only a good snowball throw from the Lawrenceburg city limits, I lived well out in Anderson County for most of my life, including 15 years on a one-lane road. I have a pretty good idea of why schools are often dismissed when my friends who live in or close to town are wondering why.

  • We’re going green! Hello spring! I am so glad to see you! New life really is springing up everywhere and the prominent color is green. Those never ending carpets will soon bring forth more colorful flowers and food. I’m pretty fond of them both!

  • Springtails

    Springtails are tiny wingless insects that can flip into the air, giving them the appearance of tiny fleas. They would go completely unnoticed except that hundreds of them can accumulate on surfaces like a small, dusty gray carpet that moves.

  • By Ben Carlson

    Column as I see ’em …

    It would be easy to slam the state’s Board of Corrections for allowing Lawrenceburg resident Kris Mitchell to serve just two years of a 10-year sentence for a rash of burglaries, some of them involving guns, for crying out loud.

    Instead, I’ll slam the state legislature that a couple of years ago created God-awful HB 463, which basically allows crooks and schnooks a get-out-jail early card, provided their crimes are non-violent.

  • We’ve all heard the saying “when one door closes, another one opens.” Well, I’m slamming the door on winter and opening it for spring. Hallelujah! Though hiking up and down my driveway in 2 feet of snow gets me into great shape for gardening, let’s be realistic — muck boots and Carhartts are hardly business casual attire.

  • The most severe emerald ash borer (EAB) attacks in Kentucky are focused in the triangular area bounded by Louisville, Lexington and northern Kentucky.

    Management

    Kentuckians who live in counties where EAB has been detected should determine the numbers and sizes of ash trees on their properties and decide on a course of action. Managing Emerald Ash Borer: Decision Guide is a good tool to use. In general, ash trees can be saved if they are:

    Healthy and growing vigorously with 75 percent or more of their leaves.

  • To the editor:

    I would really appreciate it if you all would find a place in your paper to recognize the gentleman who scrapes our road and the other roads in our little part of the world. Jobey Harvey comes during every snow event on his own tractor to scrape our roads. When it snows, we have no doubt that this wonderful man will be coming bright and early to make way for our community to get out with ease.

  • Just like those giant icicles hanging by the roadside, our chances for another snow this season just keeps getting smaller. If we get any more, the broom, not the shovel, should be able to handle it. Winter is waning.

    The Old Farmer’s Almanac has called for April and May to be warmer and dryer than normal, summer should be hot and dry, and fall warm and wet. Seems like we always have a dry summer after an especially wet winter, so be prepared with your watering options.