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Opinion

  • By Shelley Spillman

    News Editor

    Sunday, I had the pleasure of attending the Handel’s “Messiah” concert and I want credit to Sue Lou Smith, Anderson County High School staff, students and the First Christian Church Chancel Choir for hosting a fantastic concert.

    Members of the Lexington Philharmonic added to the experience, making it a truly unforgettable concert.

  • Column as I see ’em …

    By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    When the keyboard is ripped away from my mouthy fingers and I’m sent home for good, I now know how I intend to spend at least a portion of my so-called golden years.

  • Water main breaks. They’re becoming an all too common in the city. There was another one in the Alton area off Highway 151 on Sunday. Since October, we’ve had at least one water main break every month.

    Judging from exasperated Facebook posts, I know the public is tiring of hearing about water main breaks as well.

  • By Shelley Spillman

    News Editor

    The legal system standard is for alleged criminals to face a trial by judge or jury, but in this digital world it’s often a trial of public opinion via social media long before the criminal trial ever occurs.

  • By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    Those easily angered should probably skip this column and read the one on the faith page.

    From the president’s unilateral action on immigration to state fuel taxes and something so pedestrian as a set of scales, one can’t help but wonder how the people we elect get away certain things while we sit back and simply keep paying the bills.

    First the scales, for which the fiscal court used $62,000 of your money to purchase but as of Friday aren’t being used.

  • By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    Most of you will be happy to have this election over with if for no other reason than to stop hearing Mitch and Alison berate each other a thousand times a day.

    Me? I can finally stop listening to local politicians tell us what they will do to fix our tourism dilemma.

  • So often we hear that fall or winter is a particularly good time to do certain things in the landscape. This is usually due to the fact that plants have entered into winter dormancy.

  • Well, it’s here. I’m truly surprised that there weren’t parties all over the county last night. Why? There’s a bunch of you that love fall. You love the colors and the temperatures. It’s probably my second favorite season, only because it’s typically warmer than spring.

  • It’s a myth that turning off the lights isn’t necessary. The truth is that it depends on what type of lighting you have and how long the light will be off before you need it again.

    This column may bring satisfaction to some who read it because they were right, and irritation to those who were having the all too familiar disagreement about the subject.

  • To say that I am zealous about fall is an understatement. I love Starbucks Pumpkin Spice lattes and eagerly await its arrival every year, the weather is perfect, the leaves changing colors, apple cider … need I say more? But mostly, fall is my favorite season because it has way of making me feel nostalgic.

  • By Ben Carlson

    Publisher

    Column as I see ’em …

    The same organization that oversees the (public) education of your children wrote the following, which would be sort of funny were it not such a serious subject:

    “The candidate who wishes to be elected to the school council as a minority representative on the school council must be the minority. However, if a person declares himself/herself a minority, he or she should be considered so for the purpose of fulfilling the requirements of minority council member.”

  • Coach’s response ‘disappointing’

    To the editor:

    My daughter has been playing softball since she was 4 years old in the county recreation league. She has been a good ballplayer and had several coaches. For the past year, she has played on a travel team, but since she turned 9, had to move off the travel team and back into the county recreation league.

  • Robin Williams was an amazingly talented actor and comedian. He was a devoted philanthropist who dedicated time, talent and funds to help individuals and groups enjoy a better quality of life. Williams also suffered from depression. He died August 11, an apparent suicide.

    About six million men in the United States experience a depressive disorder. About 65 percent of the men with depression will go undiagnosed and without treatment. About 97 percent of those reporting depression also report that their work, home life and relationships suffer as a result of depression.

  • The world is getting too complicated.

    Used to be you could scan and print a page at the library and pay for it in less than 30 seconds. Today, it takes about 5 minutes because the alleged better is so complicated one needs a 4.5 minute training course to use it.

    Takes about 20 steps just to print a page. It used to be you put paper in scanner/printer, close lid, put money in slot, hit ‘scan’, don’t forget original. Five steps, easy enough for this autistic brain to handle.

  • If you have done any length of research on raising the minimum wage, you know there are two sides to the argument.

    You could argue either way, but there is, in my opinion, compelling data for the need for wage reform.

    First of all, the last time there was a minimum wage increase was nearly three years ago to the current $7.25 or around $15,000 annually.

    Who do you know that can make it on $15,000 a year? Consider a Gallup poll that noted in 2012 Americans spend around $151 a week on food alone.

  • The welcomed warming temperatures of spring and early summer are a relief from the cold winter temperatures of 2013-14.

    The USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map for Kentucky places most of the state in Zone 6 (–10 degrees to 0 degrees).

    The far western counties are in Zone 7a (0 degrees to 5 degrees).

    By this data, Kentucky was on average no colder than we have historically experienced. The visible indication of dead plants and utility bills indicated that something was different.